House Crow

Corvus splendens

The House Crow , also known as the Colombo Crow is a common bird of the Crow family that is of Asian origin but now found in many parts of the world, where they arrived assisted by shipping. It is between the Jackdaw and the Carrion Crow in size but is relatively slimmer than either. The forehead, crown, throat and upper breast are a richly glossed black, whilst the neck and breast are a lighter grey-brown in colour. The wings, tail and legs are black. There are regional variations in the thickness of the bill and the depth of colour in areas of the plumage.
Please show some mercy.. Shot from my backyard.. When this crow was tossing its prey.. 
Missed one another frame.. Where i could've got the frame in which this mouse was in the air and its one limb in the beak of the crow..

Overall RAW nature.. Survival of the fittest explained.. Corvus splendens,House Crow,Wild,moments,nature,wildlife

Distribution

It has a widespread distribution in southern Asia, being native to Nepal, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Maldives and Laccadive Islands, South West Thailand and coastal southern Iran. It has been introduced to East Africa around Zanzibar and Port Sudan, and arrived in Australia via ship but has up to now been exterminated. Recently it has made its arrival in Europe and has been breeding in the Hook of Holland since 1998. An individual of this species has been present in Cork Harbour on the south coast of Ireland since early September 2010.

In the New World, a small population of House Crows is established in the area around St. Petersburg, Florida.

It is associated with human settlements in all of its range, from small villages to large cities. In Singapore there was a density of 190 birds/km2 in 2001 with efforts to suppress the population in planning.

Due to a human population explosion in the areas it inhabits, this species has also proportionately multiplied. Being an omnivorous scavenger has enabled it to thrive in such circumstances.

The invasive potential for the species is great all over the tropics. This species is able to make use of resources with great flexibility and appears to be associated with humans, and no populations are known to exist independently of humans.
House Crow  Common Crow,Corvus splendens,Euploea core,House Crow

Habitat

It has a widespread distribution in southern Asia, being native to Nepal, Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Maldives and Laccadive Islands, South West Thailand and coastal southern Iran. It has been introduced to East Africa around Zanzibar and Port Sudan, and arrived in Australia via ship but has up to now been exterminated. Recently it has made its arrival in Europe and has been breeding in the Hook of Holland since 1998. An individual of this species has been present in Cork Harbour on the south coast of Ireland since early September 2010.

In the New World, a small population of House Crows is established in the area around St. Petersburg, Florida.

It is associated with human settlements in all of its range, from small villages to large cities. In Singapore there was a density of 190 birds/km2 in 2001 with efforts to suppress the population in planning.

Due to a human population explosion in the areas it inhabits, this species has also proportionately multiplied. Being an omnivorous scavenger has enabled it to thrive in such circumstances.

The invasive potential for the species is great all over the tropics. This species is able to make use of resources with great flexibility and appears to be associated with humans, and no populations are known to exist independently of humans.
Let_me_observe_u Canon EOS 600D
ISO: 800
Exposure time: 1/500sec
Aperture: f/8
Focal length: 300mm
Taken: June 10, 2014 Bangladesh,Corvus splendens,Geotagged,House Crow

Food

Crows feed largely on refuse around human habitations, small reptiles and other animals such as insects and other small invertebrates, eggs, nestlings, grain and fruits. Crows have also been observed swooping down from the air and snatching baby squirrels. Most food is taken from the ground, but also from trees as opportunity arises. They are highly opportunistic birds and given their omnivorous diet, they can survive on nearly anything that is edible. These birds can be seen near marketplaces and garbage dumps, foraging for scraps. They have also been observed to eat sand after feeding on carcass.
House Crow House Crow is very common in Sri Lanka. Corvus splendens,Crow,Geotagged,House Crow,Sri Lanka

Defense

At least some trees in the local environment seem to be necessary for its successful breeding although they occasionally nest on telephone towers. It lays 3-6 eggs in a typical stick nest, and occasionally there are several nests in the same tree. In South Asia they are parasitized by the Asian Koel. Peak breeding in India as well as Peninsular Malaysia was from April to July. Large trees with big crowns are preferred for nesting.House Crows roost communally near human habitations and often over busy streets. A study in Singapore found that the preferred roost sites were in well-lit areas with a lot of human activity, close to food sources and in tall trees with dense crowns that were separated from other trees. The roost sites were often enclosed by tall buildings.

References:

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Status: Least concern
EX EW CR EN VU NT LC
Taxonomy
KingdomAnimalia
DivisionChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCorvidae
GenusCorvus
SpeciesC. splendens