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Woodlice photo perspectives Examples of useful photo perspectives for ID when shooting woodlice.<br />
<br />
Always make sure you get a good view on the structure of head and tail(!)<br />
<br />
But of course other things are often useful too, such as:<br />
- Good views on head and and tail! (or am I repeating myself? ;o)<br />
- Colouration and surface sculpture (granulation etc.) of the whole animal<br />
- Ability to roll into a ball or not<br />
- A view on the ventral face of the pleon (hind body) to see the number of visible pseudotracheae<br />
- Shape and segmentation of the antenna and its flagellum <br />
- The shape of the hind corner of the first pereonite (1st. dorsal plate)<br />
That last point, combined with body outline at the pereon-pleon junction is also depicted here:<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/80445/woodlouse_contour_shapes.html" title="Woodlouse contour shapes"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3043/80445_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1571270410&Signature=oymURrxeVxcHwrCXEQs%2FvVNxqEI%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Woodlouse contour shapes Comparison of various details in the contour of woodlice useful in identification.<br />
<br />
The contour features shown here are NOT necessarily genus level characters, but rather serve as a general example of typical forms.<br />
<br />
This collage is intended to provide some visualization of what to look for if a description goes on about the shape of &quot;the hind corner of first pereonite&quot; or the &quot;body outline clearly indented at the pereon-pleon junction&quot; or some such.<br />
<br />
True family and genus characteristics are almost always defined by a combination of features (some ventral or microscopic). The features shown here may or may not be part or that (may vary within a family or even genus), but they always are part of the diagnosis of individual species.<br />
 Isopoda,Oniscidea,Oniscus asellus,Philoscia muscorum,Porcellionides pruinosus,Woodlouse,Woodlouse ID help" /></a></figure> Armadillidium pulchellum,Cylisticus convexus,Isopoda,Ligidium hypnorum,Oniscidea,Trachelipus rathkii,Woodlouse,Woodlouse ID help Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Woodlice photo perspectives

Examples of useful photo perspectives for ID when shooting woodlice.

Always make sure you get a good view on the structure of head and tail(!)

But of course other things are often useful too, such as:
- Good views on head and and tail! (or am I repeating myself? ;o)
- Colouration and surface sculpture (granulation etc.) of the whole animal
- Ability to roll into a ball or not
- A view on the ventral face of the pleon (hind body) to see the number of visible pseudotracheae
- Shape and segmentation of the antenna and its flagellum
- The shape of the hind corner of the first pereonite (1st. dorsal plate)
That last point, combined with body outline at the pereon-pleon junction is also depicted here:

Woodlouse contour shapes Comparison of various details in the contour of woodlice useful in identification.<br />
<br />
The contour features shown here are NOT necessarily genus level characters, but rather serve as a general example of typical forms.<br />
<br />
This collage is intended to provide some visualization of what to look for if a description goes on about the shape of "the hind corner of first pereonite" or the "body outline clearly indented at the pereon-pleon junction" or some such.<br />
<br />
True family and genus characteristics are almost always defined by a combination of features (some ventral or microscopic). The features shown here may or may not be part or that (may vary within a family or even genus), but they always are part of the diagnosis of individual species.<br />
 Isopoda,Oniscidea,Oniscus asellus,Philoscia muscorum,Porcellionides pruinosus,Woodlouse,Woodlouse ID help

    comments (4)

  1. Thank you so much for all this incredible documentation, it must take a lot of effort to produce it, and before that...to study it. Posted 3 months ago
  2. Hi Ferdy, mostly it is just a "cheap shot" now, as I've been digging up old images that I have created years ago (such as this one) for some other purpose and in the aftermath decided I might as well plaster JD with them ;o) Posted 3 months ago
  3. Very valuable collage! Posted 3 months ago
    1. Thanks Christine Posted 3 months ago

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By Pudding4brains

Public Domain
Uploaded Jun 18, 2019.