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Woodlouse contour shapes Comparison of various details in the contour of woodlice useful in identification.<br />
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The contour features shown here are NOT necessarily genus level characters, but rather serve as a general example of typical forms.<br />
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This collage is intended to provide some visualization of what to look for if a description goes on about the shape of &quot;the hind corner of first pereonite&quot; or the &quot;body outline clearly indented at the pereon-pleon junction&quot; or some such.<br />
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True family and genus characteristics are almost always defined by a combination of features (some ventral or microscopic). The features shown here may or may not be part or that (may vary within a family or even genus), but they always are part of the diagnosis of individual species.<br />
 Isopoda,Oniscidea,Oniscus asellus,Philoscia muscorum,Porcellionides pruinosus,Woodlouse,Woodlouse ID help Click/tap to enlarge

Woodlouse contour shapes

Comparison of various details in the contour of woodlice useful in identification.

The contour features shown here are NOT necessarily genus level characters, but rather serve as a general example of typical forms.

This collage is intended to provide some visualization of what to look for if a description goes on about the shape of "the hind corner of first pereonite" or the "body outline clearly indented at the pereon-pleon junction" or some such.

True family and genus characteristics are almost always defined by a combination of features (some ventral or microscopic). The features shown here may or may not be part or that (may vary within a family or even genus), but they always are part of the diagnosis of individual species.

    comments (4)

  1. So the genus is determined by the spoiler shape, I can remember that. Thanks! Posted 4 months ago
    1. Awh, somehow didn't get notification of this comment, sorry.
      To answer your question: Ehhrrmm, no :-/
      The family and genus characteristics are almost always defined by a combination of features (some ventral or microscopic). The features shown here may or may not be part or that (may vary within a family or even genus), but they always are part of the diagnosis of individual species.
      This collage is intended to show what to look for if a description goes on about the shape of "the hind corner of first pereonite" or the "body outline clearly indented at the pereon-pleon junction" or some such. It's always nice to have a visual with that.
      As you can see both the Porcellionides and the Philoscia in this example have the indented outline (Philoscia a tad stronger than Porcellionides) and both have a rounded hind corner of the first pereonite, so there must be other differences too :o)
      In this case the Philoscia is smoother and more shiny vs. Porcellionides slightly rough and dull due to wax covering and the Philoscia has the flagellum of the antennae divided in three segments (taxonomically very strong/important character!) and the Porcellionides has two segments (as have all Porcellionidae and many other families). Oniscus is very different in outline and general appearance from Philoscia, but does share the 3-segmented flagellum depicted for Philoscia here:
      Woodlouse antenna flagellum comparison Various families of woodlice have quite different shapes and segmentation on the flagellum of the antenna. This side by side shows some of the common forms Androniscus,Isopoda,Ligia,Oniscidea,Philoscia,Porcellio,Woodlouse,Woodlouse ID help

      I'll add some more text to the description latere :o)
      Posted 4 months ago, modified 4 months ago
      1. Thanks, so much! Consider that my idiotic questions and simplified conclusions are only a way to lure you out with more info, I'm asking all of this for a friend. Posted 4 months ago
        1. Bait bitten ;o) Posted 4 months ago

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By Pudding4brains

Public Domain
Uploaded Jun 13, 2019.