Thimbleberry

Rubus parviflorus

''Rubus parviflorus'', commonly called thimbleberry, is a species of ''Rubus'' native to North America.
Thimbleberry - Rubus parviflorus I was surprised to see thimbleberry growing in Vermont, as I think of it as a PNW plant. The berries are vibrant and edible. The leaves are used for tea and toilet paper.

Habitat: Along the edge of a forest
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/84172/thimbleberry_-_rubus_parviflorus.html
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/84171/thimbleberry_-_rubus_parviflorus.html Geotagged,Rubus parviflorus,Summer,United States,rubus,thimbleberry

Appearance

''Rubus parviflorus'' is a dense shrub up to 2.5 meters tall with canes no more than 1.5 centimeters in diameter, often growing in large clumps which spread through the plant's underground rhizome. Unlike many other members of the genus, it has no prickles. The leaves are palmate, up to 20 centimeters across , with five lobes; they are soft and fuzzy in texture.

The flowers are 2 to 6 centimeters in diameter, with five white petals and numerous pale yellow stamens. The flower of this species is among the largest of any ''Rubus'' species, making its Latin species name ''parviflorus'' a misnomer.

The plant produces edible composite fruit approximately a centimeter in diameter, which ripen to a bright red in mid to late summer. Like other raspberries it is not a true berry, but instead an aggregate fruit of numerous drupelets around a central core. The drupelets may be carefully removed separately from the core when picked, leaving a hollow fruit which bears a resemblance to a thimble, perhaps giving the plant its name.
Thimbleberry - Rubus parviflorus I was surprised to see thimbleberry growing in Vermont, as I think of it as a PNW plant. The berries are vibrant and edible. The leaves are used for tea and toilet paper.

Habitat: Along the edge of a forest
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/84170/thimbleberry_-_rubus_parviflorus.html
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/84172/thimbleberry_-_rubus_parviflorus.html Geotagged,Rubus parviflorus,Summer,United States

Distribution

''Rubus parviflorus'' is native to western North America from Alaska south as far as California, New Mexico, Chihuahua, and San Luis Potosí. Its range extends east to the Rocky Mountains and discontinuously to the Great Lakes Region. It grows from sea level in the north, up to elevations of 3,000 m in the south.
Developing Thimbleberries To me these berries are somewhat of a disappointment. They tend to be rather mealy and tasteless. Having said that the flowers and the berries are quite showy. The berries are very high in vitamin C. The leaves can be used to make a tea but anyone who has had the need knows the leaves make a good “natural” toilet paper... big soft fuzzy leaves and no prickles! Canada,Geotagged,Rubus parviflorus,Spring,Thimbleberry

Habitat

''Rubus parviflorus'' typically grows along roadsides, railroad tracks, and in forest clearings, commonly appearing as an early part of the ecological succession in clear cut and forest fire areas.

Thimbleberry is found in forest understories with typical flora associates including coastal woodfern , ''Trillium ovatum'' and ''Smilacina racemosa''.

References:

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Taxonomy
KingdomPlantae
DivisionAngiosperms
ClassEudicots
OrderRosales
FamilyRosaceae
GenusRubus
SpeciesR. parviflorus