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Rook

Corvus frugilegus

The rook is a member of the ''Corvidae'' family in the passerine order of birds. Named by Carl Linnaeus in 1758, the species name ''frugilegus'' is Latin for "food-gathering".
Rook During a visit back home to England, I took a trip down memory lane and spent time on Salisbury Plain and at Stonehenge, a short drive from where I grew up. It was a bitterly cold and windy winter's morning. I saw this characterful rook all alone, sitting on a fence post, perhaps trying to warm itself in the weak sunshine that would occasionally break through the cloud.

I was captivated by this large corvid - seemingly stoic given its surrounds and the weather. A great obsidian megalith paying homage to the ancient standing stones, not so far away.  Corvus frugilegus,Geotagged,Passeriformes,Rook,United Kingdom,Vertebrate,Winter,bird,corvidae,fauna

Appearance

This species is similar in size to or slightly smaller than the carrion crow with black feathers often showing a blue or bluish-purple sheen in bright sunlight. The feathers on the head, neck and shoulders are particularly dense and silky. The legs and feet are generally black and the bill grey-black.

Rooks are distinguished from similar members of the crow family by the bare grey-white skin around the base of the adult's bill in front of the eyes. The feathering around the legs also looks shaggier and laxer than the congeneric carrion crow. The juvenile is superficially more similar to the crow because it lacks the bare patch at the base of the bill, but it has a thinner bill and loses the facial feathers after about six months. Collective nouns for rooks include ''building'', ''parliament'', ''clamour'' and ''storytelling''. Their communal nesting behaviour gave rise to the term rookery.
Rook - Axios River Delta, Greece  Rook - Corvus frugilegus Animalia,Aves,Axios River Delta Complex,Bird,Chordata,Corvidae,Corvus frugilegus,Europe,Geotagged,Greece,Passeriformes,Passerine,Ramsar wetland,Rook,Spring,Wildlife

Distribution

Rooks are resident in Great Britain, Ireland and much of north and central Europe but vagrant to Iceland and parts of Scandinavia, where they typically live south of the 60th latitude and in habitats that ravens dislike, such as open agricultural areas. It also occurs as an eastern race in Asia where it differs in being slightly smaller on average, and having a somewhat more fully feathered face. In the north of its range the species has a tendency to move south during autumn though more southern populations are apt to range sporadically also. The species has been introduced to New Zealand, with several hundred birds being released there from 1862 to 1874, though today their range is very localised. There the species is an agricultural pest and it is being eradicated.
Rook - Corvus frugilegus Rook browsing into freshly plowed field for food Animal,Animalia,Aves,Bird,Chordata,Corvidae,Corvus frugilegus,Danube delta biosphere reserve,Europe,Geotagged,Nature,Passeriformes,Passerine,Romania,Rook,Spring,Wildlife

Habitat

Rooks are resident in Great Britain, Ireland and much of north and central Europe but vagrant to Iceland and parts of Scandinavia, where they typically live south of the 60th latitude and in habitats that ravens dislike, such as open agricultural areas. It also occurs as an eastern race in Asia where it differs in being slightly smaller on average, and having a somewhat more fully feathered face. In the north of its range the species has a tendency to move south during autumn though more southern populations are apt to range sporadically also. The species has been introduced to New Zealand, with several hundred birds being released there from 1862 to 1874, though today their range is very localised. There the species is an agricultural pest and it is being eradicated.
Rook - Axios River Delta, Greece  Rook - Corvus frugilegus Animalia,Aves,Axios River Delta Complex,Bird,Chordata,Corvidae,Corvus frugilegus,Europe,Geotagged,Greece,Passeriformes,Passerine,Ramsar wetland,Rook,Spring,Wildlife

Food

Food is predominantly earthworms and insect larvae, which the bird finds by probing the ground with its strong bill. It also eats cultivated cereal grain, smaller amounts of fruit, small mammals, acorns, small birds, their eggs and young and carrion. In urban sites, human food scraps are taken from rubbish dumps and streets, usually in the early hours when it is relatively quiet. It can also be seen along the seashore, feeding on insects, crustaceans and edible flotsam.

Defense

Nesting in a rookery is always colonial, usually in the very tops of the trees. Branches and twigs are broken off trees , though as many are likely to be stolen from nearby nests as are collected from trees. Eggs are usually 3–5 in number, can appear by the end of February or early March and are incubated for 16–18 days. Both adults feed the young, which are fledged by the 32nd or 33rd day.

In autumn, the young birds of the summer collect into large flocks together with unpaired birds of previous seasons, often in company with jackdaws. It is during the autumn that spectacular aerial displays can be seen by adult birds that seem to delight in the autumn gales.

References:

Some text fragments are auto parsed from Wikipedia.

Status: Least concern
EX EW CR EN VU NT LC
Taxonomy
KingdomAnimalia
DivisionChordata
ClassAves
OrderPasseriformes
FamilyCorvidae
GenusCorvus
SpeciesC. frugilegus