Creeping mahonia

Mahonia repens

''Mahonia repens'' commonly known as creeping mahonia, creeping Oregon grape, creeping barberry, or prostrate barberry, is a species of ''Mahonia'' native to the Rocky Mountains and westward areas of North America, from British Columbia and Alberta in the north through Arizona and New Mexico into northwest Mexico in the south. It is also found in many areas of California and the Great Basin region in Nevada.
A Harsh Life I found this creeping barberry growing in the Shoshone National Forest just east of Yellowstone National Park. This is in late May and the landscape had started to green up, but in the mountains, the weather is always unpredictable and it snowed a few inches overnight. I was fortunate enough to stumble upon this unique photo opportunity before the snow melted. Geotagged,Mahonia repens,National Forest,United States,Wildflowers,Wyoming

Appearance

''Mahonia repens'' is a typical mahonia with conspicuous matte blue berries. It grows as a subshrub. The yellow flowers appear in the middle of spring, and the blue berries in early summer. Although it is evergreen, in fall the leaves turn bronze. The plant is found at elevations from 300 metres to 2,200 metres .
Sunshine on the Desert Floor Seeing these for the first time agains bright red leaves under ponderosa pine trees made me feel like I was high up in the Rocky Mountains in spring. Creeping mahonia,Mahonia repens

Uses

Berries are edible and used to make jellies.

The Tolowa and Karok Indians of Northwest California used the roots for a blood and cough tonic. The Hopi, Paiute, Navajo, Shoshoni, Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Mendocino, and other tribes also used the plant for medicinal, food, and ceremonial needs. Native Americans also used the wood of the stem to produce yellow dyes.

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Status: Unknown
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Taxonomy
KingdomPlantae
DivisionAngiosperms
ClassEudicots
OrderRanunculales
FamilyBerberidaceae
GenusMahonia
Species