Agaricus auricolor

Agaricus auricolor

Agaricus auricolor is a gilled mushroom in the family Agaraceae.
Agaricus auricolor This is a picture of Agaricus auricolor at Downs Park in Pasadena, Maryland. Agaricus auricolor,Geotagged,Summer,United States

Appearance

Cap: 2.5–6 cm; convex to bell-shaped at first, becoming broadly convex or nearly flat; dry; radially fibrillose and scaly with orangish yellow to yellow scales over a pale yellow surface; the margin not lined, sometimes featuring whitish veil remnants when young, yellowing when rubbed repeatedly.

Gills: Free from the stem; close or crowded; short-gills frequent; white when young, becoming dark brown with maturity; covered with a pale yellow partial veil when in the button stage.

Stem: 3–5 cm long; 3–6 mm thick; equal above a slightly swollen base; fibrillose to shaggy; with a thin, collapsing, pale yellow ring; whitish above the ring, yellowish below; yellowing when rubbed; basal mycelium white.

Flesh: White; unchanging when sliced.

Odor and Taste: Not distinctive.

Chemical Reactions: KOH yellow on cap surface and stem base.

Spore Print: Dark brown.

Distribution

Southern Illinois and Ohio; possibly distributed throughout southeastern North America

Habitat

Saprobic; growing alone or scattered in hardwood forests; summer

References:

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Taxonomy
KingdomFungi
DivisionBasidiomycota
ClassAgaricomycetes
OrderAgaricales
FamilyAgaraceae
GenusAgaricus
SpeciesAgaricus auricolor