Entoloma moongum

Entoloma moongum

''Entoloma moongum'' is a South Australian species of fungus in the large agaric genus ''Entoloma'' . It was described as new to science by mycologist Cheryl Grgurinovic; the original holotype collections were made from Belair National Park in the 1930s by John Burton Cleland, who erroneously referred the fungus to ''Leptonia lampropus''.
Entoloma moongum A very attractive tall entoloma with dark bluish black cap about 45 mm wide. The stipe was coal black and gills whitish grey in stark contrast with the stipe and cap.
Spore print was pink, a characteristic of entolomas.
Spotted on grass on the edge of a car park, partially broken - Baluk Willam Nature Conservation Reserve. Australia,Entoloma moongum,Fall,Geotagged

Appearance

The fruitbody has a dark brown to purplish brown cap up to 19 mm in diameter with a surface that is finely fibrillose, and a cap cuticle consisting of narrow hyphae. The spores measure 9.6–13.6 by 5.6–8.4 µm and have 5–6 blunt angles. Basidia are club-shaped, measuring 34.4–48.8 by 9.6–12.8 µm, with sterigmata up to 6 µm long.

Naming

The specific epithet derives from the Aboriginal word ''moonga'', meaning "dark".

References:

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Taxonomy
KingdomFungi
DivisionBasidiomycota
ClassAgaricomycetes
OrderAgaricales
FamilyEntolomataceae
GenusEntoloma
SpeciesE. moongum
Photographed in
Australia