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Antrodiaetus pacificus

Antrodiaetus pacificus

''Antrodiaetus pacificus'' is a species of antrodiaetid mygalomorph spider. It is native to the Pacific Northwest.
Folding door spider Apparently not uncommon- but rarely seen during the day. Very cool spider - ancient relative to the tarantula. Antrodiaetus pacificus,Geotagged,Summer,United States

Appearance

''A. pacificus'' is dark brown to black. It has two or three sclerotized patches on the abdomen. Females are 13 mm long, while males are about 11 mm long.

Naming

This species was originally described by French arachnologist Eugène Simon in 1884 under the name ''Brachybothrium pacificum''. The specific epithet refers to its geographical distribution.

Distribution

It is found along the pacific coast of North America, between San Francisco Bay and Alaska. It is the northernmost North American mygalomorph. It lives in damp cool forested habitats with sandy substrates.

Behavior

''A. pacificus'' lives in a burrow it builds in sand, moss and decaying wood. It overwinters and broods its eggs inside the tubular structure. The burrow in closed during the day, and open at night, when the spider stands in the entrance, waiting for potential preys to walk nearby. It mainly preys on ants and beetles.

Habitat

It is found along the pacific coast of North America, between San Francisco Bay and Alaska. It is the northernmost North American mygalomorph. It lives in damp cool forested habitats with sandy substrates.

Evolution

''A. pacificus'' is active all year round, but mostly between late July and early September, with mating occurring between early June and late November. It can live for more than one year.

References:

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Taxonomy
KingdomAnimalia
DivisionArthropoda
ClassArachnida
OrderAraneae
FamilyAntrodiaetidae
GenusAntrodiaetus
SpeciesA. pacificus