Large Sallow Mining Bee

Andrena apicata

Andrena apicata is a species of mining bee.
Large Sallow Mining Bee April, 2016.
These bees are relatively common in the fields near Leuven and my town.
They make nests in the sand and Nomada, in the previous spotting is a cleptoparasite of them, meaning it deposits its own eggs in their nest and its larva eats the food left by mom Andrena to her own progenia.
A very similarly-looking bee is Andrena praecox. Andrena apicata,Belgium,Geotagged,Large Sallow Mining Bee,Winter

Behavior

Flight period
Univoltine; early March to late April, rarely May.

Habitat

Open deciduous woodland and abandoned sand and chalk quarries.

Reproduction

The nest burrows are generally excavated in level soil. Nests occur either singly or in small, open aggregations, the burrow entrances being rather widely scattered (pers. obs). Large compact aggregations, however, have been recorded (Perkins, 1919). Males are either seen flying low and fast over open ground, or zigzagging up tree trunks and telegraph posts, presumably in their search for receptive females. Both sexes occasionally alight on such surfaces.

Food

Flowers visited: gorse, sallow and plum. On mainland Europe, the species has been noted visiting alder (Alnus glutinosa), colt's-foot (Tussilago farfara) and dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) flowers (Dylewska, 1987). Males rarely seem to visit flowers, though specimens are commonly dusted with pollen grains, suggesting they do so.

Predators

Bees of the Nomada genus are cleptoparasites of this species.

References:

Some text fragments are auto parsed from Wikipedia.

http://www.bwars.com/bee/andrenidae/andrena-apicata
http://www.wildebijen.nl/andrena_apicata.html
Taxonomy
KingdomAnimalia
DivisionArthropoda
ClassInsecta
OrderHymenoptera
FamilyAndrenidae
GenusAndrena
SpeciesAndrena apicata
Photographed in
Belgium