Amboina box turtle

Cuora amboinensis

The Amboina box turtle , or southeast Asian box turtle is a species of Asian box turtle.

It is found in the Nicobar Islands, eastern India , Bangladesh, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, central and southern Vietnam, west Malaysia, Singapore, Philippines , Indonesia , and possibly China and Sri Lanka.

The type locality is "Amboine" Island, today Ambon Island in Indonesia.
Rescued Box Turtle Spend 6 days in forested areas looking for wild life but didn't see any Turtles or Terrapins :(
Driving back to the city at the end of our trip, we came across this Box Turtle crossing a busy road!
We stopped the car and picked it up and have it relocated to a 'safer' place. Amboina Box Turtle,Asian Box Turtle,Box Turtle,Brunei,Cuora amboinensis,Turtle

Appearance

These turtles have blackish-brown to olive brown colored shells that are not as ornate as many other box turtles. All have a blackish olive head with three yellow stripes on the side. The male can be identified by the slightly concave shape to its plastron. There is no specific pattern to what the underbellies may look like, for either sex. The only true way of telling age is to guess by the texture of the shell, as growth rings form irregularly.

There are four subspecies that are primarily differentiated by differences in the color and shape of the carapace:

⤷  ''Cuora amboinensis amboinensis'' – eastern Indonesian islands: Ambon Island, Sulawesi, the Moluccas, Buru, Seram, and East Timor and smaller islands in the region.
⟶ Have a quite flat shell with a flared marginal scutes. The plastron have a bigger black spots coloration, and possesses a bigger head. Well adapted for an aquatic lifestyle. For individuals suspected to be of this subspecies: Ratio of carapace length / height: 3.08. Average ratio dimensions of plastron spots: 1.21
⤷  ''Cuora amboinensis couro'' – south Indonesian islands: Sumatra, Java, Bali and Sumbawa.
⟶ Moderate domed carapace, some individual possesses a flared marginal scutes. The plastron shows black markings on every plastral scutes, Darker in Coloration, more oval black spots on plastron.
⤷  ''Cuora amboinensis kamaroma'' Rummler & Fritz, 1991 – Malayan box turtle or domed Malayan box turtle. Mainland Indochina , Thailand , Singapore and mainland Malaysia and Borneo.
⟶ High domed carapace and smaller, more elongated and less spotting of black pigments in the plastron. have smaller and shorter tail compared to other subspecies. do not have any flare in the marginal scutes. Average ratio of carapace length / height: 2.82. Average ratio dimensions of plastron spots: 2.14
⤷  ''Cuora amboinensis lineata'' McCord & Philippen, 1998 – Myanmar.
⟶ Resembles to ''Cuora amboinensis kamaroma'', but in the carapace there is a bright colored mid-dorsal line, and sometimes a bright colored lateral line. The plastral are possesses large black spotting of black similar to the ''Cuora amboinensis couro''.

Several distinct populations are believed to represent up to 4 more subspecies, or at least striking varieties.
⤷  Nicobar Islands
⤷  Eastern India , Bangladesh, and possibly Sri Lanka
⤷  Borneo, the Malaysian Islands, Brunei, and Palawan
⤷  Philippines



''C. a. kamaroma'' has hybridized in captivity with the Vietnamese pond turtle – a species nearly extinct in the wild – and with males of the Chinese pond turtle . Other hybrids are known, like ''C. amboinensis × Cuora trifasciata''.
Malayan box turtle Not very rare, it seems. I have come across this species several times in suburban parks. Amboina box turtle,Cuora amboinensis,Geotagged,Malaysia,Winter,kura-kura

Status

They are omnivorous, with younger turtles tending towards more meat consumption and older turtles eating a more herbivorous diet.

Although ''Cuora amboinensis'' is classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN, they are able to thrive in some areas of the world. For example, they can be found in the storm drains of Brunei. These are seriously polluted, and yet seem to be extremely popular habitat for these turtles and other animals that can withstand eutrophication. In some places, this species is hunted for use in folk medicine.

''Cuora amboinensis'' can be quite difficult to breed in captivity, compared with other box turtles. These turtles have a mating ritual very similar to that of other box turtles. No courtship occurs, the male simply climbs upon the female. He then snaps at her head, so that she closes the front half of her shell, opening the back.

Habitat

They are omnivorous, with younger turtles tending towards more meat consumption and older turtles eating a more herbivorous diet.

Although ''Cuora amboinensis'' is classified as Vulnerable by the IUCN, they are able to thrive in some areas of the world. For example, they can be found in the storm drains of Brunei. These are seriously polluted, and yet seem to be extremely popular habitat for these turtles and other animals that can withstand eutrophication. In some places, this species is hunted for use in folk medicine.

''Cuora amboinensis'' can be quite difficult to breed in captivity, compared with other box turtles. These turtles have a mating ritual very similar to that of other box turtles. No courtship occurs, the male simply climbs upon the female. He then snaps at her head, so that she closes the front half of her shell, opening the back.

References:

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Taxonomy
KingdomAnimalia
DivisionChordata
ClassReptilia
OrderTestudines
FamilyGeoemydidae
GenusCuora
SpeciesC. amboinensis