Visayan hornbill

Penelopides panini

The Visayan hornbill is a hornbill found in rainforests on the islands of Panay, Negros, Masbate, and Guimaras, and formerly Ticao, in the Philippines. It formerly included all other Philippine tarictic hornbills as subspecies, in which case the common name of the 'combined species' was shortened to tarictic hornbill.
Endangered Juvenile Visayan Hornbill - Penelopides panini First time to see this Hornbill in the same hiking trail that I have visited in the last 3 years.
However, this juvenile seems to be kept by someone in a remote village.  It is not tied with rope or kept in cages but it seems not to be wild, perching on a clothes line next to the villager's house.  I saw it flew in short distance and allows me to get within a meter's distance but the villagers asked me not to go near it.

I am not 100% sure if its Visayan Hornbill - Penelopides panini but if the ID is correct, then this species is classified as Endagered! Endagered,Geotagged,Penelopides panini,Philippines,Quezon,Summer,Visayan hornbill

Appearance

The adults show sexual dimorphism. The male has a creamy-white head and neck, a white upper chest, a reddish brown lower chest and uppertail-coverts, and a creamy-white buff tail with a broad black tip. The bill and casque are blackish; the former with yellowish ridges. The bare ocular skin is pinkish-white. The tail and bill of the female resemble that of the male, but otherwise the plumage of the female is black, and the ocular skin is blue.

Naming

There are 2 currently recognized subspecies:
⤷  ''P. p. panini'' – : Visayan tarictic hornbill, nominate, found on Panay, Negros, Masbate and Guimaras.
⤷  ''P. p. ticaensis'' – Hachisuka, 1930: Ticao tarictic hornbill, found on Ticao Island .

Status

This is a highly endangered species. The total population is estimated at 1800 individuals. There has been a heavy decline in population due to hunting and loss of habitat caused by deforestation. The subspecies ''ticaensis'' was described as "abundant" in 1905, but almost the entire forest on the island was replaced by plantations and settlements in the 20th century. The last time the Ticao tarictic was seen was in 1971, and it is now likely to be extinct. If confirmed, this is the first taxon of hornbill to go extinct in recorded history; many other taxa in the family are now at risk.

Behavior

Visayan hornbills live in groups and frequent the canopy of rainforests. These birds are noisy and emit an incessant sound that sounds like ''ta-rik-tik'', hence the name. Despite their noise they are difficult to find, being well camouflaged by the dense foliage.

The principal food of Visayan hornbill is fruit. It also eats insects, beetles, ants and earthworms .

Food

Visayan hornbills live in groups and frequent the canopy of rainforests. These birds are noisy and emit an incessant sound that sounds like ''ta-rik-tik'', hence the name. Despite their noise they are difficult to find, being well camouflaged by the dense foliage.

The principal food of Visayan hornbill is fruit. It also eats insects, beetles, ants and earthworms .

References:

Some text fragments are auto parsed from Wikipedia.

Status: Endangered
EX EW CR EN VU NT LC
Taxonomy
KingdomAnimalia
DivisionChordata
ClassAves
OrderBucerotiformes
FamilyBucerotidae
GenusPenelopides
SpeciesP. panini
Photographed in
Philippines