Black crested gibbon

Nomascus concolor

The black crested gibbon is an endangered species of gibbon found in China, Laos, and northern Vietnam, with four subspecies.
Male gibbon - who is watching who? Male gibons are black haired. The black crested gibbon is listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List. An estimated 1300 to 2000 individuals are left in the wild. Black crested gibbon,Geotagged,Nomascus concolor,The Netherlands,Zooparc Overloon

Appearance

The length from of the head to the end of body is 43–54 cm and it weighs from 6.9 to 10 kg . The species exhibits sexual dichromatism, the male is almost completely black, but sometimes with white or buff cheeks, while the female is a golden or buff colour with variable black patches, including a black streak on the head.
Oops, sorry I need to water the plants - so watch out! Black crested gibbon Black crested gibbon,Geotagged,Nomascus concolor,The Netherlands,Zooparc Overloon

Distribution

The black crested gibbon has a discontinuous distribution across southwestern China, northwestern Laos, and northern Vietnam. One thousand years ago, gibbons which may have been crested gibbons were found over a large part of southern and central China up to the Yellow River.

The four subspecies are geographically separated. The Tonkin black crested gibbon occurs in southern China and northern Vietnam , between the Black and Red Rivers. The west Yunnan black crested gibbon occurs in a small area near the Burma border, west of the Mekong, in southwestern Yunnan, southern China. The central Yunnan black crested gibbon occurs in a small region around the Wuliang Mountain, between the Mekong and Chuanhe rivers in west-central Yunnan. The Laotian black crested gibbon occurs in northwestern Laos in an isolated population on the east bank of the Mekong in Laos.

The black crested gibbon inhabits tropical evergreen, semievergreen, deciduous forests in subtropical and mountainous areas. It generally lives in high altitudes, from 2100 to 2400 m above sea level, where most of their food resources are concentrated. In Vietnam and Laos, the species is found at lower altitudes, while in China, it has been observed as high as 2689 meters.
What are you looking at?!  Black crested gibbon,Geotagged,Nomascus concolor,Primates,The Netherlands

Status

The black crested gibbon is listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List. An estimated 1300 to 2000 individuals are left in the wild.

Behavior

Gibbons are forest dwellers and are well known for their habit of swinging between the branches of the rainforest on their long arms, a method of locomotion known as brachiation. Gibbons are also adept, however, at walking upright, both on the ground and in the trees. Black crested gibbons live in small family groups consisting of a monogamous male and female and their offspring; occasionally groups reportedly may contain additional mature females. These apes are predominantly arboreal and the group forages and sleeps amongst the trees. Led by the female, the breeding pair partakes in vigorous bouts of singing in the morning, which hauntingly echo through the forest. These ‘duets' are believed to be essential in pair bond formation and reinforcement, and also serve to advertise the presence of the group within the territory. A single young is born every two to three years and the infant is usually weaned once it reaches two years old;

Black crested gibbons feed preferentially on ripe, sugar-rich fruit, such as figs, but occasionally consume vitamin-rich leaf buds, and rarely eat animals.

Habitat

The black crested gibbon has a discontinuous distribution across southwestern China, northwestern Laos, and northern Vietnam. One thousand years ago, gibbons which may have been crested gibbons were found over a large part of southern and central China up to the Yellow River.

The four subspecies are geographically separated. The Tonkin black crested gibbon occurs in southern China and northern Vietnam , between the Black and Red Rivers. The west Yunnan black crested gibbon occurs in a small area near the Burma border, west of the Mekong, in southwestern Yunnan, southern China. The central Yunnan black crested gibbon occurs in a small region around the Wuliang Mountain, between the Mekong and Chuanhe rivers in west-central Yunnan. The Laotian black crested gibbon occurs in northwestern Laos in an isolated population on the east bank of the Mekong in Laos.

The black crested gibbon inhabits tropical evergreen, semievergreen, deciduous forests in subtropical and mountainous areas. It generally lives in high altitudes, from 2100 to 2400 m above sea level, where most of their food resources are concentrated. In Vietnam and Laos, the species is found at lower altitudes, while in China, it has been observed as high as 2689 meters.

References:

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Status: Critically endangered
EX EW CR EN VU NT LC
Taxonomy
KingdomAnimalia
DivisionChordata
ClassMammalia
OrderPrimates
FamilyHylobatidae
GenusNomascus
SpeciesN. concolor
Photographed in
Netherlands