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Leaf miner (5:1), Heesch, Netherlands This is a 5x macro shot of a section of a leaf I found in the garden. It looks like the work of a leaf miner. Personally, I don't think the magnification brings additional detail that is very meaningful, would have been way better if the larvae was still in there or partly visible. Extreme Macro Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Leaf miner (5:1), Heesch, Netherlands

This is a 5x macro shot of a section of a leaf I found in the garden. It looks like the work of a leaf miner. Personally, I don't think the magnification brings additional detail that is very meaningful, would have been way better if the larvae was still in there or partly visible.

    comments (14)

  1. WHOA! I love this! Could be a blotch leaf miner. Posted 6 months ago
    1. Can you elaborate what that means? I have a friend here who wants to know. Posted 6 months ago
      1. Sure. Leaf mines come in different shapes. Identifying the shape helps to identify who made the mine. Shapes can be linear (lines), linear-blotch (lines with spots at the end), trumpet-shaped (expand in one direction), digitate (blotch mines with finger-like lobes), or blotch-shaped (irregular patches). There may be other shapes, but I'm not sure.

        So, when I wrote that it looks like a "blotch leaf miner", I mean that it looks like it is probably a blotch-shaped leaf mine...This helps narrow down which critter could have made the mine. But, of course, more photos and the ID of the plant are also crucial in identifying leaf mines.
        Posted 6 months ago
        1. Blotch mines:
          Blotch Mines on Oak (Quercus sp.) - Gracillariidae?? Just dumping this photo here for now because I don't know what it is yet, but don't want to forget about it...<br />
<br />
Habitat: Mixed forest Geotagged,Gracillariidae,Quercus,Summer,United States,blotch mine,leaf mine,oak
          Posted 6 months ago
          1. Linear-blotch mines (start out like lines, but end in a patch):
            Linear Blotch Mine - Stigmella quercipulchella Linear mine that widens and maintains a central, solid frass line. <br />
<br />
Habitat: Quercus rubra Geotagged,Nepticulidae,Stigmella,Stigmella quercipulchella,Summer,United States,leaf mine,linear blotch mine
            Posted 6 months ago
            1. Linear:
              Leaf mine of Liriomyza smilacinae larva Leaf mine of Liriomyza smilacinae larva in the leaf of Canada mayflower (Maianthemum canadense). Liriomyza smilacinae is a species of fly whose larvae mine leaves of Maianthemum species. Canada mayflower,Geotagged,Leafminer,Liriomyza smilacinae,Maianthemum canadense,Summer,United States,diptera,fly,fly larva
              Posted 6 months ago
              1. Trumpet-shaped:
                https://bugguide.net/node/view/1602670/bgimage
                Posted 6 months ago
                1. Digitate-shaped:
                  https://bugguide.net/node/view/587676
                  Posted 6 months ago
                  1. Fantastic educational answer, my friend says he found it very helpful. He also promised to take a full plant photo next time. Posted 6 months ago
                    1. I'm so glad your *friend* found it helpful. Make sure he gets a shot of the underside of the leaf next time too, in addition to the full plant photo ;). Posted 6 months ago
                      1. He said no. Only upper sides. Didn't explain why, he's quite a character. Posted 6 months ago
                        1. He sure is. Posted 6 months ago
  2. Great details,Ferdy you are mastering this stacking very quick. Posted 6 months ago
    1. Thank you for the supportive words, Ernst! This one was relatively easy given how flat it is, and it fills the screen. 3D/complex subjects are harder. When hairy extremely hard. Posted 6 months ago

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By Ferdy Christant

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Uploaded Apr 20, 2020. Captured Mar 14, 2020 16:12.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/1.2
  • 1/50s
  • ISO400
  • 50mm