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A Macro View... ... of the male catkins of the Red Alder, Alnus rubra, and why the trees have that red &ldquo;glow&rdquo;. <br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/90561/the_reddish_male_catkins.html" title="The Reddish Male Catkins"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2839/90561_thumb.jpeg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1627516810&Signature=bhe4tzI4mrTbfdCey1yr6p66bCg%3D" width="116" height="152" alt="The Reddish Male Catkins At this time of year the Red Alder trees take on a red &ldquo;glow&rdquo; because of the flowers on the male catkins. A  bunch of dried, darker cone-like female flowers can be seen, remaining from last year.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/90562/a_macro_view.html Alnus rubra,Canada,Geotagged,Winter" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/90653/a_red_glow.html" title="A Red Glow!"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2839/90653_thumb.jpeg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1627516810&Signature=w90YzNcWw0%2BdhNBf3WyHNC1kXr8%3D" width="200" height="150" alt="A Red Glow! The red glow of the male catkins in a stand of Red Alder. The common name and species name comes from the colour of the bruised or injured bark and not these catkins.      <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/90562/a_macro_view.html             <br />
  https://www.jungledragon.com/image/90561/the_reddish_male_catkins.html Alnus rubra,Canada,Geotagged,Red Alder,Winter" /></a></figure> Alnus rubra,Canada,Geotagged,Winter Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

A Macro View...

... of the male catkins of the Red Alder, Alnus rubra, and why the trees have that red “glow”.

The Reddish Male Catkins At this time of year the Red Alder trees take on a red “glow” because of the flowers on the male catkins. A  bunch of dried, darker cone-like female flowers can be seen, remaining from last year.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/90562/a_macro_view.html Alnus rubra,Canada,Geotagged,Winter

A Red Glow! The red glow of the male catkins in a stand of Red Alder. The common name and species name comes from the colour of the bruised or injured bark and not these catkins.      <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/90562/a_macro_view.html             <br />
  https://www.jungledragon.com/image/90561/the_reddish_male_catkins.html Alnus rubra,Canada,Geotagged,Red Alder,Winter

    comments (11)

  1. Love this shot! Posted one year ago
    1. Thanks a bunch! I had been waiting and waiting for them to “ripen” enough to take a photo. Posted one year ago
      1. So cool! I've never seen catkins like this before, but will be looking! It's a nice sign of spring! Posted one year ago
        1. Looks similar to yours,
          Alder - Alnus incana ssp. rugosa Habitat: Growing in a bog in a mixed forest<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/78344/unknown.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/78403/alder_-_alnus_sp.html Alnus incana,Geotagged,Grey alder,Spring,United States,alder,alnus

          Same thing? I am not too familiar with other Alnus species.
          Posted one year ago
          1. Wow! I guess it must be? I should have gotten a closer look. Posted one year ago
            1. I realize that the range of Alnus rubra is supposedly limited to the west coast but I believe there have been sightings on the east coast. Who knows/knew? Posted one year ago
  2. Beautiful, like jewels (rubies/jade) Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
    1. Thank you very much. I was surprised at how interesting they looked when viewed this close. Posted one year ago
  3. Today's Facebook post:

    Gorgeous! This is the male catkin of a red alder tree (Alnus rubra). Red alder is a deciduous tree that is native to western North America. It’s one of the largest species of alder in the world and can reach heights of 30 meters (98 ft). It's monoecious, meaning that there are separate male and female flowers on the same individual tree. Male flowers are long, drooping, red catkins, while the female flowers take the shape of short, woody cones.

    Red alder is a pioneer species that quickly establishes in openings created by disturbances, such as landslides, logging, or fire. It actually improves the soil because it's a nitrogen-fixer and puts nitrogen back in the soil, unlike most plants. Its roots have nodules that house a nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Frankia alni. The bacterium absorbs nitrogen from the air and makes it available to the tree. In turn, the tree provides the bacterium with sugar. As a result of this symbiotic relationship, the alder improves the fertility of the soil in which it grows thus providing favorable conditions for the successional species that grow after the alder. {Spotted in British Columbia, Canada by JungleDragon user, Gary Fast} #JungleDragon #Redalder #Alnusrubra

    https://www.facebook.com/jungledragonwildlife/
    Posted one year ago
    1. Great job, Christine! Posted one year ago
      1. Thanks, Gary! Great job on the photo :). Posted one year ago

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''Alnus rubra'', the red alder, is a deciduous broadleaf tree native to western North America.

Similar species: Beeches, Oaks, Walnuts
Species identified by gary fast
View gary fast's profile

By gary fast

All rights reserved
Uploaded Mar 4, 2020. Captured Mar 3, 2020 15:59 in Jocelyn Rd, Whaletown, BC V0P 1Z0, Canada.
  • E-M5MarkII
  • f/6.3
  • 1/60s
  • ISO3200
  • 60mm