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Lepiota haemorrhagica Fruit-body Description<br />
Pileus (Cap) Diameter to 50 mm or more; when young conico-convex, con- vex becoming nearly plane, often with an umbo, radial splitting at the margin revealing white flesh; surface dry, covered with reddish brown fibrillose scales that are thicker at the centre of the pileus; colour reddish brown. Lamel- lae (Gills) Attachment free; close; white to cream-coloured, staining blood-red when bruised. Stipe (Stem) Central; generally up to 50 mm long and 6 mm thick; slender to relatively stout, attenuated upwards; surface dry, glabrous, finely fibrillose; colour reddish brown, lighter at the apex. Annulus promi- nent, initially about two-thirds up the stipe, as a movable ring, eventually sliding down the stipe or disappearing. Spore Print White to pinkish white<br />
<a href="https://ift.tt/2H2v65h" rel="nofollow">https://ift.tt/2H2v65h</a> Australia,Geotagged,Summer Click/tap to enlarge

Lepiota haemorrhagica

Fruit-body Description
Pileus (Cap) Diameter to 50 mm or more; when young conico-convex, con- vex becoming nearly plane, often with an umbo, radial splitting at the margin revealing white flesh; surface dry, covered with reddish brown fibrillose scales that are thicker at the centre of the pileus; colour reddish brown. Lamel- lae (Gills) Attachment free; close; white to cream-coloured, staining blood-red when bruised. Stipe (Stem) Central; generally up to 50 mm long and 6 mm thick; slender to relatively stout, attenuated upwards; surface dry, glabrous, finely fibrillose; colour reddish brown, lighter at the apex. Annulus promi- nent, initially about two-thirds up the stipe, as a movable ring, eventually sliding down the stipe or disappearing. Spore Print White to pinkish white
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    comments (9)

  1. Hmm.. no sign of annulus and a very pale stipe. Posted 15 days ago
    1. Thank you Mark, I did notice the paleness in the stipe but as it mentions the annulus eventually disappears might be what happens , I will keep on searching, but if you have some advice would be appreciated.

      Posted 15 days ago
      1. Leucoagaricus (?rubrotinctus) was a thought but it's not better than your ID. Posted 14 days ago
        1. Should I undo the current ID? Or is it still a likely match? Posted 14 days ago
          1. Ferdy, I have some doubt and Mark expressed some doubt and I think it is best to list it as unidentified. I will still check or seek help but for now please change the status.
            I prefere it ,thanks
            Posted 14 days ago
            1. Done! Note that removing a species ID is something you can also do yourself, simply by clicking the red X on the identification section.

              Happy to do it, but just wanted to share that its possible to do it yourself as well.
              Posted 14 days ago
        2. Thanks Mark .
          As there is some doubt including some from me I asked Ferdy to change it to unidentified.
          I will keep checking a
          But feel better that way.
          Posted 14 days ago
          1. I think it's probably right to back up on species iD Ernst.
            The main thing I've learned from myco experts in Aus. is it's a very complex and mostly unknown world and generally they all seem to be super cautious. Image searches for some names often reveal general confusion. A decent microscope seems invaluable.
            I think it's good that we attach such conversations to these sightings.
            Posted 14 days ago
            1. I fully agree but I wonder sometimes as it is so difficult especially with Australian fungi to have a category to maybe genus level . But I am no expert and don’t know if that is possible. Posted 14 days ago

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By Ernst

All rights reserved
Uploaded Feb 12, 2020. Captured Feb 12, 2020 13:44 in 25 Bugong Rd, Illaroo NSW 2540, Australia.
  • iPhone 6s Plus
  • f/2.2
  • 1/17s
  • ISO50
  • 4.15mm