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Snail on mossy tree, Rio Ñambi, Colombia Not sure what to say about this snail, so will go completely off-topic :) <br />
<br />
This snail&#039;s anatomy is a possible example of a universal &quot;design&quot; constant of which the value is 1:1.618. This expresses a ratio between a sub part in relation to a total part. For example, the length of your forearm divided by the total length of your entire arm.<br />
<br />
The ratio value of 1.618 is claimed to be often found in nature, from universe level to micro level:<br />
<a href="https://www.canva.com/learn/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/08-tb-800x0.jpeg" rel="nofollow">https://www.canva.com/learn/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/08-tb-800x0.jpeg</a><br />
<br />
This &quot;golden ratio&quot; is often seen by graphic and web designers as some universal or natural attractive way to size things in relation to each other. For example, small text in relation to larger text may be sized 1.6 times smaller based on this theory. It will then supposedly look balanced, natural, attractive. This number, named &quot;phi&quot; goes beyond modern design, it also includes architecture, geometry and art.<br />
<br />
There&#039;s plenty of criticism on the theory though. Once known, some people have the tendency to backport reality into this constant.<br />
<br />
However, should you ever not having any idea at all how to size things in relation to each other, the value is 1.618. When asked why, I&#039;ve just given you ammunition to come across as incredibly smart. <br />
<br />
The go-to species example demonstrating &quot;phi&quot; is the Chambered Nautilus:<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59460/the_chambered_nautilus_nautilus_pompilius.html" title="The Chambered Nautilus (Nautilus pompilius)."><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3326/59460_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1569456010&Signature=CAFeXtXqf48KILZeyfp3zAnqhzg%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="The Chambered Nautilus (Nautilus pompilius). The Chambered Nautilus, Nautilus pompilius, is a cephalopod, related to squid, octopi, and cuttlefish, ranging through the tropical Pacific and Indian Oceans.  Individuals live in deep water by day (down to 610m/2000 feet depth).  At night, they swim up to shallow water to feed.  They have poor eyesight and rely on touch and smell to detect prey.  To capture prey items, they use their tentacles which, in contrast to other cephalopods, are free of suction cups.  Some Nautilus species have up to 90 tentacles.  Nautilus can adjust the direction they travel by changing the orientation of a structure called the siphon.  They use jet propulsion to move, pumping water out of their siphon.  Adult Nautilus pompilius can grow to about 8 inches (20 cm) in length.  The shell of Nautilus pompilius is filled with gasses and liquids; the animal&rsquo;s body is accommodated only within the outer most chamber.  The nautilus can move liquids into and out of the chambers to regulate buoyancy.  The liquids move between chambers through tube-like connections called siphuncles.  Nautilus pompilius are little changed over the last 150 million years and have extinct relatives that date back as far as 450 million years.  Nautilus pompilius is threatened owing to over harvest for the shell trade.   Chambered Nautilus,Chambered nautilus,Deep Sea,Life in the dark,Nautilidae,Nautilus pompilius,Pearly Nautilus,cephalopod,daily vertical migration,deep water,over collection,shell harvest" /></a></figure><br />
Yet it requires a look inside these &quot;chambers&quot; to see why:<br />
<a href="https://media.springernature.com/original/springer-static/image/art:10.1007/s00004-018-0419-3/MediaObjects/4_2018_419_Fig8_HTML.jpg" rel="nofollow">https://media.springernature.com/original/springer-static/image/art:10.1007/s00004-018-0419-3/MediaObjects/4_2018_419_Fig8_HTML.jpg</a> Colombia,Colombia 2018,Colombia South,Rio Ñambi,South America Click/tap to enlarge

Snail on mossy tree, Rio Ñambi, Colombia

Not sure what to say about this snail, so will go completely off-topic :)

This snail's anatomy is a possible example of a universal "design" constant of which the value is 1:1.618. This expresses a ratio between a sub part in relation to a total part. For example, the length of your forearm divided by the total length of your entire arm.

The ratio value of 1.618 is claimed to be often found in nature, from universe level to micro level:
https://www.canva.com/learn/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/08-tb-800x0.jpeg

This "golden ratio" is often seen by graphic and web designers as some universal or natural attractive way to size things in relation to each other. For example, small text in relation to larger text may be sized 1.6 times smaller based on this theory. It will then supposedly look balanced, natural, attractive. This number, named "phi" goes beyond modern design, it also includes architecture, geometry and art.

There's plenty of criticism on the theory though. Once known, some people have the tendency to backport reality into this constant.

However, should you ever not having any idea at all how to size things in relation to each other, the value is 1.618. When asked why, I've just given you ammunition to come across as incredibly smart.

The go-to species example demonstrating "phi" is the Chambered Nautilus:

The Chambered Nautilus (Nautilus pompilius). The Chambered Nautilus, Nautilus pompilius, is a cephalopod, related to squid, octopi, and cuttlefish, ranging through the tropical Pacific and Indian Oceans.  Individuals live in deep water by day (down to 610m/2000 feet depth).  At night, they swim up to shallow water to feed.  They have poor eyesight and rely on touch and smell to detect prey.  To capture prey items, they use their tentacles which, in contrast to other cephalopods, are free of suction cups.  Some Nautilus species have up to 90 tentacles.  Nautilus can adjust the direction they travel by changing the orientation of a structure called the siphon.  They use jet propulsion to move, pumping water out of their siphon.  Adult Nautilus pompilius can grow to about 8 inches (20 cm) in length.  The shell of Nautilus pompilius is filled with gasses and liquids; the animal’s body is accommodated only within the outer most chamber.  The nautilus can move liquids into and out of the chambers to regulate buoyancy.  The liquids move between chambers through tube-like connections called siphuncles.  Nautilus pompilius are little changed over the last 150 million years and have extinct relatives that date back as far as 450 million years.  Nautilus pompilius is threatened owing to over harvest for the shell trade.   Chambered Nautilus,Chambered nautilus,Deep Sea,Life in the dark,Nautilidae,Nautilus pompilius,Pearly Nautilus,cephalopod,daily vertical migration,deep water,over collection,shell harvest

Yet it requires a look inside these "chambers" to see why:
https://media.springernature.com/original/springer-static/image/art:10.1007/s00004-018-0419-3/MediaObjects/4_2018_419_Fig8_HTML.jpg

    comments (3)

  1. That is a very hairy snail!

    I've never given much thought to the golden ratio, but remember learning in art school that a lot of Renaissance artists used it, especially da Vinci.
    Posted 3 months ago
    1. Yes, I too was wondering why it is so hairy, strange. Posted 3 months ago
      1. Lisa has found hairy snails before, so it must be a "normalish" thing. Posted 3 months ago

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By fchristant

All rights reserved
Uploaded May 14, 2019. Captured Oct 31, 2018 08:10.
  • NIKON D810
  • f/16.0
  • 1/60s
  • ISO64
  • 105mm