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Caterpillar Exuvia Empty caterpillar &quot;skin&quot; hanging on grass in an overgrown backyard habitat. <br />
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I&#039;m guessing this is a molt, but I&#039;m not sure? Any ideas are most welcome! Geotagged,Summer,United States,White-marked tussock moth,lepidoptera,moth,moths Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Caterpillar Exuvia

Empty caterpillar "skin" hanging on grass in an overgrown backyard habitat.

I'm guessing this is a molt, but I'm not sure? Any ideas are most welcome!

    comments (13)

  1. Oh, wow! So cool! Posted one year ago
    1. Thank you, Marta! <3 I thought it was a cool finding too! Posted one year ago
  2. Fantastic species. Very nice Posted one year ago
    1. Thank you, Stephen! Posted one year ago
  3. This is awesome! I don't think the ID is correct though - I agree that it is a caterpillar exuviae, but if it was Orgyia leucostigma, it would have some darker hair tufts. When IDing caterpillars and their shed skins, it's also important to note how many thoracic legs, anterior prolegs, and anal prolegs are present. I would guess that this could be Spilosoma virginica (there is a white form) or some other arctiid. Posted one year ago
    1. Hmmm interesting! Thanks! I will look in that direction! Posted one year ago
      1. Could also be Hyphantria cunea. Posted one year ago
        1. Or maybe Estigmene acrea? Posted one year ago
          1. The only thing that is throwing me off is that the upper side (not pictured here as it flew away in the wind before I could photograph) was tufted/shaped like Orgyia (and not like the ones you mentioned. It also had some darker "hairs" on the upper side. I wouldn't have jumped to the initial ID if I hadn't seen that dorsal morphology.

            Maybe my memory is failing me :P
            Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
          2. If you zoom in on this photo, you can clearly see the black/gray hairs on the dorsal side in the background Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
            1. Hmm, I do see that. What about Lophocampa caryae as a possibility? Posted one year ago
              1. I will probably leave the ID blank as I can't confirm anything 100 percent. From my memory, the dorsal side had the 4 thick (toothbrush-like) tufts typical of Orgyia leucostigma, however. Posted one year ago
                1. Oh, interesting! Posted one year ago

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By Lisa Kimmerling

All rights reserved
Uploaded Dec 2, 2018. Captured Sep 1, 2018 00:55 in 110 Earl St, Plainville, GA 30733, USA.
  • Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
  • f/5.6
  • 1/250s
  • ISO400
  • 60mm