JungleDragon is a nature and wildlife community for photographers, travellers and anyone who loves nature. We're genuine, free, ad-free and beautiful.

Join

Isopod Iridovirus As this image shows two species of woodlice infected with an iridovirus side by side (left: Armadillidium vulgare; right: Porcellio scaber), I&#039;ll use this to try and integrate the virus as such in the JD taxonomy and identify the &quot;species&quot; accordingly.<br />
Yes, I am aware that a virus is not necessarily considered part of the tree of life, but they do play an important role and maybe some other images of plant disease or what have you might be presented here as well :o)   Armadillidium vulgare,IIV 6,IIV-31,Invertebrate Iridovirus,Invertebrate iridescent virus 6,Iridovirus,Isopod Iridovirus,Porcellio scaber Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Isopod Iridovirus

As this image shows two species of woodlice infected with an iridovirus side by side (left: Armadillidium vulgare; right: Porcellio scaber), I'll use this to try and integrate the virus as such in the JD taxonomy and identify the "species" accordingly.
Yes, I am aware that a virus is not necessarily considered part of the tree of life, but they do play an important role and maybe some other images of plant disease or what have you might be presented here as well :o)

    comments (7)

  1. This is my first time hearing of iridoviruses! :O Can you tell us more about them? Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
    1. Hi Lisa, members of the Iridoviridae infect all sorts of animals (fish, frogs, invertebrates to name a few) and as one of the symptoms cause the "skin" to reflect mostly the blue-ish light spectrum. There is some discussion on the exact taxonomic placement, suggesting that not the colour caused should be used, but rather the structure - possibly combining/splitting the current Iridoviridae with other strains.
      I've added some links to the species description, with the first ones being freely accessable PDFs in the English language :o)
      Posted one year ago
  2. A most interesting move, doesn't happen every day to have a division added to the tree, and the names of the "species" are also not what I'm used to, simply because I know nothing about viruses. And that's a great starting point for education, so thank you for doing this. Posted one year ago
    1. Hi Ferdy, glad you approve - wasn't too sure about this :o) Posted one year ago
      1. "“It’s a bold move Cotton, let’s see if it pays off.” Posted one year ago
  3. I have edited the classification based on the following information:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virus_classification
    Posted one year ago
    1. Thanks Jivko! I had looked at the info provided by the ICTV and they didn't seem to offer any clear higher classification for the Iridoviridae. May well be that the classification is still in flux, but very happy to roll with this until new insights are published! :o) Cheers, Arp Posted one year ago

Sign in or Join in order to comment.

No species identified

The species on this photo is not identified yet. When signed in, you can identify species on photos that you uploaded. If you have earned the social image editing capability, you can also identify species on photos uploaded by others.

View Pudding4brains's profile

By Pudding4brains

Public Domain
Uploaded Nov 22, 2018.