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Moon snail egg casing (Naticidae) Madidir III, Lembeh.<br />
Without the progenitors nearby is quite hard to tell the species :-)<br />
The first time I saw moon snail eggs was in New England, US and thought they were flat tires :-D<br />
<br />
<a href="http://www.wildsingapore.com/wildfacts/mollusca/gastropoda/naticidae/naticidae.htm" rel="nofollow">http://www.wildsingapore.com/wildfacts/mollusca/gastropoda/naticidae/naticidae.htm</a><br />
<a href="http://www.seaslugforum.net/find/naticid" rel="nofollow">http://www.seaslugforum.net/find/naticid</a><br />
<br />
In this link you can see the moon snails from New England US area with their egg case:<br />
<a href="http://www.andrewjmartinez.com/image.pl/400/_Northern_Moon_Snail_with_its_egg_case.html" rel="nofollow">http://www.andrewjmartinez.com/image.pl/400/_Northern_Moon_Snail_with_its_egg_case.html</a><br />
<br />
In this link you have a cool drawing on how the female makes this egg casing!<br />
<a href="https://www.amusingplanet.com/2017/06/the-sand-collars-of-moon-snail.html?m=1" rel="nofollow">https://www.amusingplanet.com/2017/06/the-sand-collars-of-moon-snail.html?m=1</a><br />
<br />
Sand collar <br />
<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_collar" rel="nofollow">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_collar</a><br />
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia<br />
Jump to navigation<br />
Jump to search<br />
Sand collar from the moonsnail Neverita josephinia and shell of that species on the right, Mediterranean Sea<br />
A somewhat damaged sand collar of Euspira catena. When the light is shing through the collar, it is possible to make out the individual egg capsules within it.<br />
<br />
Sand collars are the characteristic egg masses of one family of sea snails, the moon snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the family Naticidae. These egg masses are often found washed up either whole, or sometimes in fragments, on sandy beaches where moon snails are living, either intertidally or subtidally.<br />
Description<br />
<br />
When they are intact, sand collars are shaped rather like an old-fashioned detachable shirt or blouse collar (hence the name). The sand collar consists of sand grains cemented together by a gelatinous matrix, with the embedded eggs contained within the matrix. The collar is laid by the female moon snail, and the size of the sand collar gives an indication of the size of the adult female moon snail that laid it; larger species of moon snail lay larger sand collars.<br />
<br />
A fresh sand collar feels stiff and yet flexible, as if it were made out of plastic. Each sand collar contains thousands of capsules, each one housing one or several live embryos. In species with planktonic development, these embryos hatch out as bilobed veligers. After the eggs hatch, the sand collar disintegrates.  Eggs,Geotagged,Indonesia,Lembeh,Moon Snail,Naticidae,Spring Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Moon snail egg casing (Naticidae)

Madidir III, Lembeh.
Without the progenitors nearby is quite hard to tell the species :-)
The first time I saw moon snail eggs was in New England, US and thought they were flat tires :-D

http://www.wildsingapore.com/wildfacts/mollusca/gastropoda/naticidae/naticidae.htm
http://www.seaslugforum.net/find/naticid

In this link you can see the moon snails from New England US area with their egg case:
http://www.andrewjmartinez.com/image.pl/400/_Northern_Moon_Snail_with_its_egg_case.html

In this link you have a cool drawing on how the female makes this egg casing!
https://www.amusingplanet.com/2017/06/the-sand-collars-of-moon-snail.html?m=1

Sand collar
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_collar
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation
Jump to search
Sand collar from the moonsnail Neverita josephinia and shell of that species on the right, Mediterranean Sea
A somewhat damaged sand collar of Euspira catena. When the light is shing through the collar, it is possible to make out the individual egg capsules within it.

Sand collars are the characteristic egg masses of one family of sea snails, the moon snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the family Naticidae. These egg masses are often found washed up either whole, or sometimes in fragments, on sandy beaches where moon snails are living, either intertidally or subtidally.
Description

When they are intact, sand collars are shaped rather like an old-fashioned detachable shirt or blouse collar (hence the name). The sand collar consists of sand grains cemented together by a gelatinous matrix, with the embedded eggs contained within the matrix. The collar is laid by the female moon snail, and the size of the sand collar gives an indication of the size of the adult female moon snail that laid it; larger species of moon snail lay larger sand collars.

A fresh sand collar feels stiff and yet flexible, as if it were made out of plastic. Each sand collar contains thousands of capsules, each one housing one or several live embryos. In species with planktonic development, these embryos hatch out as bilobed veligers. After the eggs hatch, the sand collar disintegrates.

    comments (18)

  1. Care to elaborate a bit more? An example of a moon snail? Posted one year ago
    1. I added a link :-) Posted one year ago
  2. Hi, the one we have around here, the Northern Pacific, is Euspira lewisii or Lewis’ moonsnail. The “collars” as we call them are lighter in colour but look very similar. Have to take a look in the bay to see if any are present at low tide. Gary Posted one year ago
    1. It would be nice to see the ones from your area. The moon snails from New England that I saw while diving in Rockport area were big! (in Wikipedia it says up to 12.5 cm - 7 In. but I think this is just the shell size) ....I think I have a pic from one possibly moon snail coming from Lembeh but I will check the ID when I get to that one, later on this year :-) Posted one year ago
      1. They keep changing “things”. It’s now Neverita lewisii! Hard for an old guy like me to keep up. The moon snails we have here a supposedly the largest of the moon snails. Not bragging just repeating Wikipedia. The ones on the west coast of Vancouver Island are not only large but very heavily built I’m thinking because of the harsher living conditions due to the pounding surf. A long time ago I can remember kayaking in the Broken Goup Islands and paddling over about five or six of these large fellows “cruising” on top of the sand. Quite the sight. It is still fun at extreme low tide to walk on a sandy beach watching for sandy humps that have a moon snail underneath searching for prey. Many of the clam shells on that sandy beach would have 4mm holes drilled into them by the snails radula. Posted one year ago
        1. Haha.. indeed, is hard to keep up with all the taxonomic changes; I think on the one hand is because before people used morphology but now they can also use DNA to differentiate species within a family. but about the namings they are crazy, aren't they ? :-D
          And as for the moon snails being the biggest in your side I believe you totally! I have no idea why but the ones in cold waters are much bigger than the tropical ones, at least for the ones I know.
          Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
          1. And here an example of their size :-D
            https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/781443
            Posted one year ago
            1. Thanks for the link. Around here it seems that everyone has at least a few of the empty shells of Lewis’ Moonsnail as decoration. The shells ranging from 15cm to smaller. Believe it or not the smaller ones are the most treasured, by myself, because they are harder to find. Around our house and yard there must be at least a dozen of these shells. I believe that the shell can be the second largest in mass, locally. The winner going to the Purple Hinged Rock Scallop, Crassadoma gigantea. I will have to wait until we get an extreme low tide to get a photo of one of those. No underwater camera! Posted one year ago
              1. Nice that you can get the empty shells and see them in low tide! :-)
                Back in Rockport MA I only saw them deeper, while diving. But it may also have been because I was not diving at very low tide so they were always submerged (?)...in any case, remarkable creatures :-)
                Posted one year ago
                1. A good thing for us there is always something new to look at or a new way to look at something we have already seen. Posted one year ago
  3. Could be poo of Sea Cucumber?
    Sees them often in Anilao too.
    Posted one year ago
      1. I am aware of this one, but there are many different types of sea cucumber.
        And your pic, does looks like sand/substrates that usually sea cucumber spews/shit out.
        Posted one year ago
        1. Check the rest of links. I have never seen a sea cucumber pooping on that shape :-)
          Check also this
          https://www.hamahamaoysters.com/blogs/learn/18295627-may-9-2008-introduction-to-the-moon-snail-part-deux
          Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
        2. Also check this: the moon snail egg collar is made of sand also that is why it looks like sand to you :-D
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_collar
          Posted one year ago
          1. I just read this “Each sand collar contains thousands of capsules, each one housing one or several live embryos” on the Wikipedia link above. Amazing!! Posted one year ago
            1. It is a very original way to give birth, isn't??
              Maybe this is their version of a cake for the babies :-D
              Posted one year ago
              1. ;-)
                Posted one year ago

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By Patomarazul

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Uploaded Sep 19, 2018. Captured May 20, 2018 06:05 in Kelurahan Madidir Weru Lingkungan I, Madidir Weru, Bitung Tengah, Pakadoodan, Maesa, Kota Bitung, Sulawesi Utara 95514, Indonesia.
  • TG-5
  • f/9.0
  • 1/40s
  • ISO100
  • 7.86mm