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Metamasius ensirostris - Broca-Rajada-da-Bananeira / Palm-boring Weevil / Bromeliad Weevil (Germar, 1824) Coleoptera: Polyphaga: Cucujiformia: Curculionoidea: Dryophthoridae: Dryophthorinae: Rhynchophorini (tribal group): Sphenophorini: Sphenophorina<br />
<br />
OR<br />
<br />
Coleoptera: Polyphaga: Cucujiformia: Curculionoidea: Curculionidae: Dryophthorinae: Sphenophorini: Sphenophorina<br />
<br />
Full post here: <figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/65164/metamasius_ensirostris_-_broca-rajada-da-bananeira_palm-boring_weevil_bromeliad_weevil_germar_1824.html" title="Metamasius ensirostris - Broca-Rajada-da-Bananeira / Palm-boring Weevil / Bromeliad Weevil (Germar, 1824)"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3305/65164_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1594857610&Signature=XTMm8GzgqV%2F8wV9I90gspGrE70Q%3D" width="144" height="152" alt="Metamasius ensirostris - Broca-Rajada-da-Bananeira / Palm-boring Weevil / Bromeliad Weevil (Germar, 1824) Coleoptera: Polyphaga: Cucujiformia: Curculionoidea: Dryophthoridae: Dryophthorinae: Rhynchophorini (tribal group): Sphenophorini: Sphenophorina<br />
<br />
OR<br />
<br />
Coleoptera: Polyphaga: Cucujiformia: Curculionoidea: Curculionidae: Dryophthorinae: Sphenophorini: Sphenophorina<br />
<br />
Length: 12-14mm<br />
Date: 1st of November, 2017 at 03:59:12<br />
Another picture:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/65165/metamasius_sp._-_broca-rajada-da-bananeira_bromeliad_weevil_germar_1824.html<br />
<br />
Metamasius is a genus of beetles in the order Coleoptera, suborder Polyphaga, infraorder Cucujiformia, superfamily Curculionoidea, family Dryophthoridae (or Curculionidae, see below), subfamily Dryophthorinae, tribal group Rhynchophorini (absent in the taxonomy in which it is in Curculionidae), tribe Sphenophorini and subtribe Sphenophorina.<br />
<br />
&quot;Dryophthorinae is a weevil subfamily within the family Curculionidae. While it is not universally accepted as distinct from other curculionid subfamilies, at least one major recent revision elevated it to family rank, as Dryophthoridae.<br />
<br />
Alonso-Zarazaga, M. A. &amp; Lyal, C.H.C. 1999. A world catalogue of families and genera of Curculionoidea (Insecta: Coleoptera) (Excepting Scolytidae and Platypodidae). Entomopraxis, SCP Edition, Barcelona.&quot;<br />
<br />
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dryophthorinae<br />
<br />
The beetle had six orange, irregular patches on the black elytra; pronotum is black with two orange stripes on the laterals seemingly interrupted midways through and proceeding to go toward (but ending before) the head and two small orange stripes proximal to the elytra on the middle of the pronotum, each side by side and slightly inclined antagonically. The six orange patches on the elytra are distributed as follows: two proximal to the suture and the pronotum and two distal from the pronotum and proximal to the suture. The other two are located on the laterals. Rostrum medium-big-sized compared to the size of the specimen and connected to it were the antennae, with an unknown amount of segments; both black. Legs composed of coxa, trochanter, femur, tibia, tarsus and tarsites; all black or dark red. Eyes were black, large, compound and merged in color with the head. A very, very thin orange ring seems to circle the area between the head and the pronotum, barely visible in the picture and requires confirmation. The subject portrayed measured around 12-14mm.<br />
<br />
Similar genera exist such as Sitophilus and Rhodobaenus (to a person not in the entomology world).<br />
<br />
https://bugguide.net/node/view/757523/bgpage<br />
<br />
When grubs, Metamasius in general bore through the inside of the host plant to pupate in a fibrous pupal case. Around 60 days are necessary for the emergence of the adult which will look for mates. Then, the female will search for host plants to lay the eggs.<br />
<br />
I believe their host plants are many, going from this Petunia sp. flower and tropical ornamental plants to sugar canes, palms, banana trees and some other woody plants.<br />
<br />
They can feign death to avoid predation. The larvae are milky-white, robust, fleshy and with a red head. The larvae will feed on living plant tissue by making galleries inside or attack the rhizome of the plant. Adults are most often found under elevated temperature conditions and elevated rainfall conditions. They are damaged by the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana and parasitized by a few Tachinid flies, such as Billea rhynchophorae. A parasitoid was also detected on the pupae of Metamasius, Diaughia angust.<br />
<br />
Source:<br />
http://www.agencia.cnptia.embrapa.br/gestor/pupunha/arvore/CONT000h31l5ka702wx7ha06keammqdrq8hg.html - Just for information as I&#039;m against what they do.<br />
<br />
Many species of Metamasius exist, with few pictures available compared to the amount of species there are. Most Metamasius sp. in Google are identified as M. hemipterus, which is not the case for mine, and apparently even M. hemipterus has subspecies: http://www.catalogueoflife.org/col/browse/tree/id/bbcf8d39f162ecda15ac220698326b3c. Mine is a Metamasius ensirostris, identified with certainty by borisb on iNaturalist and on Flickr. I can&#039;t seem to be able to place a link to his profiles here, so I&#039;ll place it in the comments.<br />
<br />
https://www.ipmimages.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=5550718 - Proof.<br />
<br />
Their habitats are unknown to me. They seem to inhabit primary and secondary forests, fields, crop fields, plains and suburban habitats. I&#039;ve never seen them in an urban habitat. They are widespread in South America until Southern Argentina.<br />
<br />
More sources:<br />
<br />
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metamasius<br />
https://bugguide.net/node/view/42821 - Not the species portrayed, but some informations can be extracted from it.<br />
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21594164<br />
https://www.flickr.com/photos/129030464@N06/15201715594<br />
http://www.ecoregistros.org/ficha/Metamasius-sp<br />
http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2002f/zt00080.pdf Animalia,Brazil,Coleoptera,Cucujiformia,Curculionidae,Curculionoidea,Dryophthoridae,Dryophthorinae,Geotagged,Insecta,Metamasius,Metamasius ensirostris,Palm-Boring Weevil,Polyphaga,Rhynchophorini,Sphenophorina,Sphenophorini,Weevils,animal,animals" /></a></figure><br />
<br />
Date: 1st of November, 2017 at 03:59:30 Animalia,Brazil,Coleoptera,Cucujiformia,Curculionidae,Curculionoidea,Dryophthoridae,Dryophthorinae,Geotagged,Insecta,Metamasius,Polyphaga,Rhynchophorini,Sphenophorina,Sphenophorini,Weevils,animal,animals,insect,insects Click/tap to enlarge

Metamasius ensirostris - Broca-Rajada-da-Bananeira / Palm-boring Weevil / Bromeliad Weevil (Germar, 1824)

Coleoptera: Polyphaga: Cucujiformia: Curculionoidea: Dryophthoridae: Dryophthorinae: Rhynchophorini (tribal group): Sphenophorini: Sphenophorina

OR

Coleoptera: Polyphaga: Cucujiformia: Curculionoidea: Curculionidae: Dryophthorinae: Sphenophorini: Sphenophorina

Full post here:

Metamasius ensirostris - Broca-Rajada-da-Bananeira / Palm-boring Weevil / Bromeliad Weevil (Germar, 1824) Coleoptera: Polyphaga: Cucujiformia: Curculionoidea: Dryophthoridae: Dryophthorinae: Rhynchophorini (tribal group): Sphenophorini: Sphenophorina<br />
<br />
OR<br />
<br />
Coleoptera: Polyphaga: Cucujiformia: Curculionoidea: Curculionidae: Dryophthorinae: Sphenophorini: Sphenophorina<br />
<br />
Length: 12-14mm<br />
Date: 1st of November, 2017 at 03:59:12<br />
Another picture:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/65165/metamasius_sp._-_broca-rajada-da-bananeira_bromeliad_weevil_germar_1824.html<br />
<br />
Metamasius is a genus of beetles in the order Coleoptera, suborder Polyphaga, infraorder Cucujiformia, superfamily Curculionoidea, family Dryophthoridae (or Curculionidae, see below), subfamily Dryophthorinae, tribal group Rhynchophorini (absent in the taxonomy in which it is in Curculionidae), tribe Sphenophorini and subtribe Sphenophorina.<br />
<br />
"Dryophthorinae is a weevil subfamily within the family Curculionidae. While it is not universally accepted as distinct from other curculionid subfamilies, at least one major recent revision elevated it to family rank, as Dryophthoridae.<br />
<br />
Alonso-Zarazaga, M. A. & Lyal, C.H.C. 1999. A world catalogue of families and genera of Curculionoidea (Insecta: Coleoptera) (Excepting Scolytidae and Platypodidae). Entomopraxis, SCP Edition, Barcelona."<br />
<br />
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dryophthorinae<br />
<br />
The beetle had six orange, irregular patches on the black elytra; pronotum is black with two orange stripes on the laterals seemingly interrupted midways through and proceeding to go toward (but ending before) the head and two small orange stripes proximal to the elytra on the middle of the pronotum, each side by side and slightly inclined antagonically. The six orange patches on the elytra are distributed as follows: two proximal to the suture and the pronotum and two distal from the pronotum and proximal to the suture. The other two are located on the laterals. Rostrum medium-big-sized compared to the size of the specimen and connected to it were the antennae, with an unknown amount of segments; both black. Legs composed of coxa, trochanter, femur, tibia, tarsus and tarsites; all black or dark red. Eyes were black, large, compound and merged in color with the head. A very, very thin orange ring seems to circle the area between the head and the pronotum, barely visible in the picture and requires confirmation. The subject portrayed measured around 12-14mm.<br />
<br />
Similar genera exist such as Sitophilus and Rhodobaenus (to a person not in the entomology world).<br />
<br />
https://bugguide.net/node/view/757523/bgpage<br />
<br />
When grubs, Metamasius in general bore through the inside of the host plant to pupate in a fibrous pupal case. Around 60 days are necessary for the emergence of the adult which will look for mates. Then, the female will search for host plants to lay the eggs.<br />
<br />
I believe their host plants are many, going from this Petunia sp. flower and tropical ornamental plants to sugar canes, palms, banana trees and some other woody plants.<br />
<br />
They can feign death to avoid predation. The larvae are milky-white, robust, fleshy and with a red head. The larvae will feed on living plant tissue by making galleries inside or attack the rhizome of the plant. Adults are most often found under elevated temperature conditions and elevated rainfall conditions. They are damaged by the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana and parasitized by a few Tachinid flies, such as Billea rhynchophorae. A parasitoid was also detected on the pupae of Metamasius, Diaughia angust.<br />
<br />
Source:<br />
http://www.agencia.cnptia.embrapa.br/gestor/pupunha/arvore/CONT000h31l5ka702wx7ha06keammqdrq8hg.html - Just for information as I'm against what they do.<br />
<br />
Many species of Metamasius exist, with few pictures available compared to the amount of species there are. Most Metamasius sp. in Google are identified as M. hemipterus, which is not the case for mine, and apparently even M. hemipterus has subspecies: http://www.catalogueoflife.org/col/browse/tree/id/bbcf8d39f162ecda15ac220698326b3c. Mine is a Metamasius ensirostris, identified with certainty by borisb on iNaturalist and on Flickr. I can't seem to be able to place a link to his profiles here, so I'll place it in the comments.<br />
<br />
https://www.ipmimages.org/browse/detail.cfm?imgnum=5550718 - Proof.<br />
<br />
Their habitats are unknown to me. They seem to inhabit primary and secondary forests, fields, crop fields, plains and suburban habitats. I've never seen them in an urban habitat. They are widespread in South America until Southern Argentina.<br />
<br />
More sources:<br />
<br />
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metamasius<br />
https://bugguide.net/node/view/42821 - Not the species portrayed, but some informations can be extracted from it.<br />
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21594164<br />
https://www.flickr.com/photos/129030464@N06/15201715594<br />
http://www.ecoregistros.org/ficha/Metamasius-sp<br />
http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2002f/zt00080.pdf Animalia,Brazil,Coleoptera,Cucujiformia,Curculionidae,Curculionoidea,Dryophthoridae,Dryophthorinae,Geotagged,Insecta,Metamasius,Metamasius ensirostris,Palm-Boring Weevil,Polyphaga,Rhynchophorini,Sphenophorina,Sphenophorini,Weevils,animal,animals


Date: 1st of November, 2017 at 03:59:30

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By Oscar Neto

All rights reserved
Uploaded Aug 17, 2018. Captured Nov 1, 2017 15:59 in R. Cruz e Souza, 636, Benedito Novo - SC, 89124-000, Brazil.
  • NIKON D7000
  • f/8.0
  • 1/250s
  • ISO2000
  • 105mm