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Euglyphis sp. - Lappet Moth (Hübner, [1820]) Lepidoptera: Apoditrysia: Lasiocampoidea: Lasiocampidae: Poecilocampinae (Macromphaliinae to some entities / para algumas entidades): Macromphaliini (???)<br />
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Wingspan: Unknown<br />
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Date: 19th of May, 2017 at 09:50:11pm.<br />
Location: Brazil, Santa Catarina, Benedito Novo<br />
<br />
Euglyphis is a gigantic genus of lappet moths in the order Lepidoptera, superfamily Lasiocampoidea, family Lasiocampidae, subfamily Poecilocampinae (still considered Macromphaliinae by some entities) and, supposedly, tribe Macromphaliini (species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Macromphaliini).<br />
<br />
The genus is massive, and the pictures of live specimen of Euglyphis are scarce. Some species seem very alike and reliable identification is done through DNA or microscopic examinations of the genitalia. I can almost guarantee this is an Euglyphis moth, but as long as there is no 100% certainty, I&#039;ll leave this as doubtful. According to Cesar of Insetologia (the one who ID&#039;d this moth), this is in or somewhere near Euglyphis. In BoldSystems, one can find a list of the species of Euglyphis, some of which are black like the one portrayed: <a href="http://www.boldsystems.org/index.php/Taxbrowser_Taxonpage?taxid=48200" rel="nofollow">http://www.boldsystems.org/index.php/Taxbrowser_Taxonpage?taxid=48200</a><br />
<br />
As of now, Macromphaliinae occurs only in the New World. The genus Euglyphis ranges from Mexico throughout Central and South America, and the Lesser and Greater Antilles. This genus&#039;s male genitalia possesses a normal uncus, well developed gnathos, absent or much reduced socii and valves consisting of two parts - a lower membranous lobe and an upper or costal lobe that is usually well sclerotized. A source can be found further down the text.<br />
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Larvae of Lasiocampids were found feeding on Annonaceae, Chrysobalanaceae, Clusiaceae, Lauraceae, Malpighiaceae, Malvaceae, Melastomataceae, Myristicaceae, Myrtaceae, Piperaceae and Sapotaceae. I do not know which of these plants are hosts of the genus Euglyphis. Their caterpillars seem to be attacked by Braconidae, Eulophidae and Ichneumonidae Hymenopterans and Tachinidae Dipterans. Reminds me of an Euglyphis barda but I doubt it is one.<br />
<br />
<br />
This one was found in a suburban habitat heavily surrounded by primary and secondary forests, so this is key to further knowledge.<br />
<br />
Source mentioned: <a href="http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2011/f/z03020p059f.pdf" rel="nofollow">http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2011/f/z03020p059f.pdf</a><br />
<br />
Further sources:<br />
<br />
<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euglyphis" rel="nofollow">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euglyphis</a><br />
<a href="http://eol.org/pages/48173/overview" rel="nofollow">http://eol.org/pages/48173/overview</a> Animalia,Arthropoda,Brazil,Euglyphis,Geotagged,Insecta,Insects,Lasiocampidae,Lasiocampoidea,Lepidoptera,Macromphaliinae,Macromphaliini,Moth,Moth Week 2018,Poecilocampinae,South America,hairy moth,heterocera,insect,moths Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Euglyphis sp. - Lappet Moth (Hübner, [1820])

Lepidoptera: Apoditrysia: Lasiocampoidea: Lasiocampidae: Poecilocampinae (Macromphaliinae to some entities / para algumas entidades): Macromphaliini (???)

Wingspan: Unknown

Date: 19th of May, 2017 at 09:50:11pm.
Location: Brazil, Santa Catarina, Benedito Novo

Euglyphis is a gigantic genus of lappet moths in the order Lepidoptera, superfamily Lasiocampoidea, family Lasiocampidae, subfamily Poecilocampinae (still considered Macromphaliinae by some entities) and, supposedly, tribe Macromphaliini (species.wikimedia.org/wiki/Macromphaliini).

The genus is massive, and the pictures of live specimen of Euglyphis are scarce. Some species seem very alike and reliable identification is done through DNA or microscopic examinations of the genitalia. I can almost guarantee this is an Euglyphis moth, but as long as there is no 100% certainty, I'll leave this as doubtful. According to Cesar of Insetologia (the one who ID'd this moth), this is in or somewhere near Euglyphis. In BoldSystems, one can find a list of the species of Euglyphis, some of which are black like the one portrayed: http://www.boldsystems.org/index.php/Taxbrowser_Taxonpage?taxid=48200

As of now, Macromphaliinae occurs only in the New World. The genus Euglyphis ranges from Mexico throughout Central and South America, and the Lesser and Greater Antilles. This genus's male genitalia possesses a normal uncus, well developed gnathos, absent or much reduced socii and valves consisting of two parts - a lower membranous lobe and an upper or costal lobe that is usually well sclerotized. A source can be found further down the text.

Larvae of Lasiocampids were found feeding on Annonaceae, Chrysobalanaceae, Clusiaceae, Lauraceae, Malpighiaceae, Malvaceae, Melastomataceae, Myristicaceae, Myrtaceae, Piperaceae and Sapotaceae. I do not know which of these plants are hosts of the genus Euglyphis. Their caterpillars seem to be attacked by Braconidae, Eulophidae and Ichneumonidae Hymenopterans and Tachinidae Dipterans. Reminds me of an Euglyphis barda but I doubt it is one.


This one was found in a suburban habitat heavily surrounded by primary and secondary forests, so this is key to further knowledge.

Source mentioned: http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2011/f/z03020p059f.pdf

Further sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euglyphis
http://eol.org/pages/48173/overview

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By Oscar Neto

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Uploaded Jul 13, 2018. Captured in R. Cruz e Souza, 636, Benedito Novo - SC, 89124-000, Brazil.