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Northern Spring Peeper - Pseudacris crucifer crucifer This frog had tan skin with darker markings, including a distinctive X-shaped mark on its back. They can darken or lighten their skin color to better camouflage themselves in only a few minutes. It was about 2 cm long.<br />
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Spotted on rotting wood in a mixed forest.<br />
<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62245/northern_spring_peeper_-_pseudacris_crucifer_crucifer.html" title="Northern Spring Peeper - Pseudacris crucifer crucifer"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/62245_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1562198410&Signature=XH9pGyzogSy3ZiGsZz5cNRUjG70%3D" width="200" height="162" alt="Northern Spring Peeper - Pseudacris crucifer crucifer This frog had tan skin with darker markings, including a distinctive X-shaped mark on its back. They can darken or lighten their skin color to better camouflage themselves in only a few minutes. It was about 2 cm long.<br />
<br />
 Spotted on rotting wood in a mixed forest. <br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62244/northern_spring_peeper_-_pseudacris_crucifer_crucifer.html Geotagged,Pseudacris crucifer,Pseudacris crucifer crucifer,Spring peeper,Summer,United States,frog,northern spring peeper" /></a></figure> Geotagged,Northern Spring Peeper,Pseudacris crucifer,Pseudacris crucifer crucifer,Spring peeper,Summer,United States,frog Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Northern Spring Peeper - Pseudacris crucifer crucifer

This frog had tan skin with darker markings, including a distinctive X-shaped mark on its back. They can darken or lighten their skin color to better camouflage themselves in only a few minutes. It was about 2 cm long.

Spotted on rotting wood in a mixed forest.

Northern Spring Peeper - Pseudacris crucifer crucifer This frog had tan skin with darker markings, including a distinctive X-shaped mark on its back. They can darken or lighten their skin color to better camouflage themselves in only a few minutes. It was about 2 cm long.<br />
<br />
 Spotted on rotting wood in a mixed forest. <br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/62244/northern_spring_peeper_-_pseudacris_crucifer_crucifer.html Geotagged,Pseudacris crucifer,Pseudacris crucifer crucifer,Spring peeper,Summer,United States,frog,northern spring peeper

    comments (8)

  1. Spectacular capture of a gorgeous species! Posted 10 months ago
    1. Thanks... When I spotted it, it was flat on the wood and hard to see. But, once it saw me, it stuck out it’s left foot (see 2nd photo) as if it was trying to decide if I was a threat and it should run away. We sat and watched each other for a few minutes before it relaxed and flattened itself back against the log. Posted 10 months ago
      1. I once read that when you disturb a natural scene (which is like impossible to avoid completely), it takes about 20 minutes before things get back to normal. In a way that sounds logical, but it means that if you have the patience to stand still and be quiet for that long, you have basically blended into the environment, you're part of it, and not a threat. Posted 10 months ago
        1. I’m not very patient, but I love to sit on the ground in the woods and wait. When you sit quietly like that - anywhere in nature - you see and notice things that you normally wouldn’t. I spot tiny fungi, insects, etc. Frogs and salamanders walk right past me. It’s incredible to connect with creatures and to just observe each other. Some freak out and immediately run off, but others will stay and eventually seem to get comfortable with my presence. Posted 10 months ago
          1. True, sometimes after a few mins I notice a huge spider right next to my head, somehow completely missed before. I think it's similar to eyes needing time to get used to the dark, they need time to get used to focusing closely. Posted 10 months ago
            1. Exactly. Posted 10 months ago
  2. Cutie pie! Posted 10 months ago
    1. Thanks Lisa :) Posted 10 months ago

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The spring peeper is a small chorus frog widespread throughout the eastern United States and Canada. They are so called because of their chirping call that marks the beginning of spring. There are two subspecies:
* The northern, ''P. c. crucifer'', found all over the eastern United States and eastern Canada.
* The southern, ''P. c. bartramiana''. The southern is distinguished by a strong dark marking on its belly. ''P. c. bartramiana'' is found along the southern Gulf Coast from southeastern.. more

Similar species: Frogs
Species identified by Christine Young
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By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jun 30, 2018. Captured Jun 30, 2018 08:55 in 80 Main St, Sharon, CT 06069, USA.
  • Canon EOS 80D
  • f/4.0
  • 1/64s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm