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Diptera (Unidentified Aquatic Fly Larvae) Segmented, aquatic larva positioning anal spiracles above water for breathing. Around 30mm length. I saw these last year as well, but I&#039;m still unsure what genus or species these are!<br />
<br />
Habitat:<br />
<br />
In a vernal pool with fine sediment from the dirt road. Steep hillside nearby. Surrounded by dense mixed hardwood forest.<br />
<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61968/diptera_unidentified_aquatic_fly_larvae.html" title="Diptera (Unidentified Aquatic Fly Larvae)"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3231/61968_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1544054410&Signature=fO%2BlVuz5cWriwr5WJ5xZzkoAp3A%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Diptera (Unidentified Aquatic Fly Larvae) Segmented, aquatic larva positioning anal spiracles above water for breathing. Around 30mm length. I saw these last year as well, but I&#039;m still unsure what genus or species these are!<br />
<br />
Habitat:<br />
<br />
In a vernal pool with fine sediment from the dirt road. Steep hillside nearby. Surrounded by dense mixed hardwood forest.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61967/diptera_unidentified_aquatic_fly_larvae.html<br />
Video of movement from last year: <br />
https://vimeo.com/230282296 Geotagged,Spring,United States" /></a></figure><br />
Video of movement from last year: <br />
<section class="video"><iframe width="448" height="252" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/230282296?title=0&byline=0&portrait=0" frameborder="0"></iframe></section> Geotagged,Spring,United States Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Diptera (Unidentified Aquatic Fly Larvae)

Segmented, aquatic larva positioning anal spiracles above water for breathing. Around 30mm length. I saw these last year as well, but I'm still unsure what genus or species these are!

Habitat:

In a vernal pool with fine sediment from the dirt road. Steep hillside nearby. Surrounded by dense mixed hardwood forest.

Diptera (Unidentified Aquatic Fly Larvae) Segmented, aquatic larva positioning anal spiracles above water for breathing. Around 30mm length. I saw these last year as well, but I'm still unsure what genus or species these are!<br />
<br />
Habitat:<br />
<br />
In a vernal pool with fine sediment from the dirt road. Steep hillside nearby. Surrounded by dense mixed hardwood forest.<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61967/diptera_unidentified_aquatic_fly_larvae.html<br />
Video of movement from last year: <br />
https://vimeo.com/230282296 Geotagged,Spring,United States

Video of movement from last year:

    comments (17)

  1. Try comparing to soldier flies (Stratiomyidae) Posted 4 months ago
    1. Thanks, Christine. I have a couple of families in mind, but according to the BugGuide people they should be left at Diptera at this stage! :/ I'm not qualified to agree or disagree! Posted 4 months ago
    2. I'm tempted to rear some of them just to find out! Posted 4 months ago
      1. You should!! Posted 4 months ago
        1. How do you think I should go about doing that? Collect some of the substrate/water/mud in a jar (with proper ventilation) and just let them go? Posted 4 months ago
          1. Hmm. It can be tricky. I have reared many kinds of aquatic larvae and find that some do well, while others don't. I would collect some, plus water, and substrate. They will feed on algae and detritus, so make sure you get enough gook, but not too much. You want the right combo to mimic natural conditions. Keep in an open container with comparable sunlight and temperature to their natural habitat. Cover the container (with ventilation) when they pupate (if they are soldier flies, this will happen within the last larval exuvia). If they are soldier flies, they should be nearing maturation judging by their size. Posted 4 months ago
            1. Thank you so much! I will give it a try! Posted 4 months ago
              1. Yay! Good luck! Posted 4 months ago
  2. Love the video btw ;) Posted 4 months ago
    1. Thank you. This was back before I lost my iPhone, so I had decent video capabilities. *cries* My current video is terrible! Posted 4 months ago
      1. Oh waahhh! I wonder if you'll ever find that phone. Some wild pig probably ate it ;P. Jason's phone doesn't have decent video? I try to use my camera to take video, but it is harder to focus while holding steady bc its so heavy. Phone is so much easier, but definitely not as good quality! Posted 4 months ago
  3. That's a cool sight, I've never seen anything like it! Posted 4 months ago
    1. They are really cool! They were alien to me last year when I first saw them! Luckily, they have returned to the same vernal pools!

      I guess I might try rearing them to find out what they really are!

      P.S. It is kind of funny that they breathe through their butts. :D
      Posted 4 months ago
      1. Lol :)
        What does "rearing" mean in this context? Taking a specimen?
        Posted 4 months ago
        1. Hahaha!
          REAR--->
          (verb)
          1. bring up and care for (a child) until they are fully grown, especially in a particular manner or place
          Posted 4 months ago
          1. Today I Learned. Posted 4 months ago
      2. Hehe Posted 4 months ago, modified 4 months ago

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By Lisa Kimmerling

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jun 25, 2018. Captured Jun 15, 2018 22:40 in 240 Hopewell Dr, Ranger, GA 30734, USA.
  • Canon EOS DIGITAL REBEL XTi
  • f/2.8
  • 1/60s
  • ISO400
  • 60mm