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cf. Scopula sp. - Cream Wave Moth (Schrank, 1802) Lepidoptera: Bombycina: Geometroidea: Geometridae: ??? Possibly Sterrhinae: Scopulini<br />
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Full post here: <figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61139/cf._scopula_sp._-_cream_wave_moth_schrank_1802.html" title="cf. Scopula sp. - Cream Wave Moth (Schrank, 1802)"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3305/61139_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1573084810&Signature=UwkswoHXZ3CbkvaGxEOKgHdfAfI%3D" width="200" height="124" alt="cf. Scopula sp. - Cream Wave Moth (Schrank, 1802) Lepidoptera: Bombycina: Geometroidea: Geometridae: ??? Possibly Sterrhinae: Scopulini<br />
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Second picture - original version, another individual - here: https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61140/cf._scopula_sp._-_cream_wave_moth_schrank_1802.html<br />
<br />
Just by looking it was obvious that this moth belonged to the family Geometridae, in the order Lepidoptera, subdivision Bombycina and superfamily Geometroidea. From here onwards are dangerous grounds, so I asked for help from Insetologia.<br />
<br />
The wing venations are determining factors in moth identification.<br />
<br />
According to Cesar of Insetologia and the image he provided (https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3492ab299a5fe42e3ef87e4001189d1735f0055f52dbe1e5afec154eabe78c48.jpg), venation Sc+R is more attatched to Rs in Larentiinae, at least when Rs finds M1. Apparently, in Oenochrominae Sc+R does not meet with Rs at the point shown in the picture. M2 is weak or inexistent in Ennominae. As for Geometrinae, besides being generally green-colored, the M2 is equidistant to M1 and M3 (hard). Oenochrominae are generally more more robust and darker than Sterrhinae. What remains from the four steps is the subfamily Sterrhinae.<br />
<br />
I manipulated the second picture of this moth in two ways to better see the venations: https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/784a2939489544ccbc930693689223a6be8484c4bdb62a984d822a5b204a6a88.jpg<br />
<br />
https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/dc05830625ef9f75c91e6db9079d52b4661809b4f0607e14df0688e41f53865a.jpg<br />
<br />
While Cesar manipulated the third way (he is and will always be allowed to): https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/0112f43811c863bddfbb60ecd6cf4e66ed880e8e79d0a8fa82aa05c06e09dde8.jpg<br />
<br />
With this, it could be concluded that this moth is not a member of Larentiinae and not a member of Ennominae. Through the venations, he could not discard Geometrinae or Oenochrominae. So, this is either an Oenochrominae, a Geometrinae (unlikely, could not discard with security, but possible, maybe?) or Sterrhinae.<br />
<br />
The original picture that was manipulated is of my own intelectual property and is of another individual, not the one in this picture as can be seen by the date, but I believe they are of the same species or, at the very least, the same genus as they were both virtually identical. The genus is a risky guess, but I thought putting it as a guess would bring more benefit than harm. Cesar found this moth that was identified as Scopula sp. (https://www.flickr.com/photos/72842252@N04/24988002745) and looks a lot like my specimen, member of the subfamily Sterrhinae and tribe Scopulini.<br />
<br />
In conclusion, this moth is unidentified. There is a high probability of this being a Scopula sp., genus that I&#039;ll leave as a risky guess. The chances that this is from the subfamily Sterrhinae were more credible to me than those of Oenochrominae or Geometrinae.<br />
<br />
If you can confirm this is a Scopula or at least provide further light to the situation, please leave a message or contact me. You will be credited.<br />
<br />
Take a look at how gigantic this genus is: https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scopula<br />
<br />
Another source:<br />
<br />
Article in Insetologia and the whole discussion: http://www.insetologia.com.br/2018/05/mariposa-geometridea-no-ceara.html<br />
<br />
Date: 13th of April, 2018 at 08:29:12pm.<br />
Location: Brazil, Cear&aacute;, Fortaleza (Lat: -3.75, Long: -38.51, 16th floor) Arthropoda,Brazil,GEOMETROIDEA,Geometer moth,Geometrid Moth,Insecta,Lepidoptera,Mariposas Neotropicais,Mariposas do Brasil,Moth,Neotropical,Scopula,Scopulini,Sterrhinae,brasil,brazilian moths,cear&aacute;,cream wave moth,fortaleza,geometridae" /></a></figure><br />
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Date: 9th of May, 2018 at 10:12:59pm.<br />
Location: Brazil, Cear&aacute;, Fortaleza (Lat: -3.75, Long: -38.51, 16th floor) Arthropoda,Brazil,GEOMETROIDEA,Geometer moth,Geometrid Moth,Insecta,Lepidoptera,Mariposas Neotropicais,Mariposas do Brasil,Moth,Neotropical,Scopula,Scopulini,Sterrhinae,brasil,brazilian moths,ceará,cream wave moth,fortaleza,geometridae Click/tap to enlarge

cf. Scopula sp. - Cream Wave Moth (Schrank, 1802)

Lepidoptera: Bombycina: Geometroidea: Geometridae: ??? Possibly Sterrhinae: Scopulini

Full post here:

cf. Scopula sp. - Cream Wave Moth (Schrank, 1802) Lepidoptera: Bombycina: Geometroidea: Geometridae: ??? Possibly Sterrhinae: Scopulini<br />
<br />
Second picture - original version, another individual - here: https://www.jungledragon.com/image/61140/cf._scopula_sp._-_cream_wave_moth_schrank_1802.html<br />
<br />
Just by looking it was obvious that this moth belonged to the family Geometridae, in the order Lepidoptera, subdivision Bombycina and superfamily Geometroidea. From here onwards are dangerous grounds, so I asked for help from Insetologia.<br />
<br />
The wing venations are determining factors in moth identification.<br />
<br />
According to Cesar of Insetologia and the image he provided (https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/3492ab299a5fe42e3ef87e4001189d1735f0055f52dbe1e5afec154eabe78c48.jpg), venation Sc+R is more attatched to Rs in Larentiinae, at least when Rs finds M1. Apparently, in Oenochrominae Sc+R does not meet with Rs at the point shown in the picture. M2 is weak or inexistent in Ennominae. As for Geometrinae, besides being generally green-colored, the M2 is equidistant to M1 and M3 (hard). Oenochrominae are generally more more robust and darker than Sterrhinae. What remains from the four steps is the subfamily Sterrhinae.<br />
<br />
I manipulated the second picture of this moth in two ways to better see the venations: https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/784a2939489544ccbc930693689223a6be8484c4bdb62a984d822a5b204a6a88.jpg<br />
<br />
https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/dc05830625ef9f75c91e6db9079d52b4661809b4f0607e14df0688e41f53865a.jpg<br />
<br />
While Cesar manipulated the third way (he is and will always be allowed to): https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/0112f43811c863bddfbb60ecd6cf4e66ed880e8e79d0a8fa82aa05c06e09dde8.jpg<br />
<br />
With this, it could be concluded that this moth is not a member of Larentiinae and not a member of Ennominae. Through the venations, he could not discard Geometrinae or Oenochrominae. So, this is either an Oenochrominae, a Geometrinae (unlikely, could not discard with security, but possible, maybe?) or Sterrhinae.<br />
<br />
The original picture that was manipulated is of my own intelectual property and is of another individual, not the one in this picture as can be seen by the date, but I believe they are of the same species or, at the very least, the same genus as they were both virtually identical. The genus is a risky guess, but I thought putting it as a guess would bring more benefit than harm. Cesar found this moth that was identified as Scopula sp. (https://www.flickr.com/photos/72842252@N04/24988002745) and looks a lot like my specimen, member of the subfamily Sterrhinae and tribe Scopulini.<br />
<br />
In conclusion, this moth is unidentified. There is a high probability of this being a Scopula sp., genus that I'll leave as a risky guess. The chances that this is from the subfamily Sterrhinae were more credible to me than those of Oenochrominae or Geometrinae.<br />
<br />
If you can confirm this is a Scopula or at least provide further light to the situation, please leave a message or contact me. You will be credited.<br />
<br />
Take a look at how gigantic this genus is: https://pt.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scopula<br />
<br />
Another source:<br />
<br />
Article in Insetologia and the whole discussion: http://www.insetologia.com.br/2018/05/mariposa-geometridea-no-ceara.html<br />
<br />
Date: 13th of April, 2018 at 08:29:12pm.<br />
Location: Brazil, Ceará, Fortaleza (Lat: -3.75, Long: -38.51, 16th floor) Arthropoda,Brazil,GEOMETROIDEA,Geometer moth,Geometrid Moth,Insecta,Lepidoptera,Mariposas Neotropicais,Mariposas do Brasil,Moth,Neotropical,Scopula,Scopulini,Sterrhinae,brasil,brazilian moths,ceará,cream wave moth,fortaleza,geometridae


Date: 9th of May, 2018 at 10:12:59pm.
Location: Brazil, Ceará, Fortaleza (Lat: -3.75, Long: -38.51, 16th floor)

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By Oscar Neto

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Uploaded Jun 6, 2018. Captured in Rua Tomás Acioli, 1185 - Joaquim Távora, Fortaleza - CE, 60135-180, Brazil.