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Spring Peeper Not a good photo, I realize. But, I wanted to share it because of what is going on with these frogs.  In the town where I live, a large, paved parking lot was built a few years ago over the spring migration route of these frogs.  So, every spring (usually on the first warmish, rainy nights of spring), these frogs wake up and start to migrate towards the woodland pools.  But, they have to cross the massive and busy parking lot in order to get to the pools.  It&#039;s not uncommon to see dozens of these frogs squished in the parking lot.  Each year, there are fewer frogs.  <br />
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This spring, I started taking my kids out late at night to help rescue these frogs and deliver them to the edge of the woods and the pools.  This photo shows one of the lucky frogs that we rescued. We average around 15 frogs per night, which is probably less than 25% of what there was a few years ago.   Geotagged,Pseudacris crucifer,Spring,Spring peeper,United States,frog,peeper,spring peeper Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Spring Peeper

Not a good photo, I realize. But, I wanted to share it because of what is going on with these frogs. In the town where I live, a large, paved parking lot was built a few years ago over the spring migration route of these frogs. So, every spring (usually on the first warmish, rainy nights of spring), these frogs wake up and start to migrate towards the woodland pools. But, they have to cross the massive and busy parking lot in order to get to the pools. It's not uncommon to see dozens of these frogs squished in the parking lot. Each year, there are fewer frogs.

This spring, I started taking my kids out late at night to help rescue these frogs and deliver them to the edge of the woods and the pools. This photo shows one of the lucky frogs that we rescued. We average around 15 frogs per night, which is probably less than 25% of what there was a few years ago.

    comments (6)

  1. "They paved paradise and put up a parking lot".

    So sad. Thank you for the incredible conservation effort you're doing. I hope you're advertising it in your circles so that perhaps others will help.

    And the photo is fine. Incredible even.
    Posted 2 months ago
    1. Thanks Ferdy. It is so sad. Many people are starting to help with amphibian migrations, and hopefully it will make an impact. Posted 2 months ago
  2. Adorable, Christine! You are such a sweetie for doing your part in saving these wonderful frogs! It makes me so sad to hear that their numbers have declined. :( Keep up the awesome work! Posted 2 months ago
    1. Thanks Lisa. It is crazy how much their numbers in this location have declined.

      And, thanks for the inspiration as you were the one who gave me the idea to do this ;)
      Posted 2 months ago
      1. *blushes*

        I'm sure they are beyond grateful to you!
        Posted 2 months ago
        1. *blushes* squared ;P Posted 2 months ago

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The spring peeper is a small chorus frog widespread throughout the eastern United States and Canada. They are so called because of their chirping call that marks the beginning of spring. There are two subspecies:
* The northern, ''P. c. crucifer'', found all over the eastern United States and eastern Canada.
* The southern, ''P. c. bartramiana''. The southern is distinguished by a strong dark marking on its belly. ''P. c. bartramiana'' is found along the southern Gulf Coast from southeastern.. more

Similar species: Frogs
Species identified by Christine Young
View Christine Young's profile

By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded May 16, 2018. Captured Apr 24, 2018 19:51 in 5 East St, New Milford, CT 06776, USA.
  • Canon EOS 80D
  • f/4.0
  • 1/64s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm