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Andinobates victimatus - face closeup II, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there&#039;s any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how &quot;new&quot; this species is to science, I&#039;m going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We&#039;ve come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html" title="Andinobates victimatus - in habitat, Uraba, Colombia"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/59096_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1547683210&Signature=TrYM2b3XBTCYIh13%2Foj0ILXtqiM%3D" width="200" height="142" alt="Andinobates victimatus - in habitat, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there&#039;s any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how &quot;new&quot; this species is to science, I&#039;m going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We&#039;ve come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco &amp; Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urab&aacute;,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html" title="Andinobates victimatus - in habitat II, Uraba, Colombia"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/59097_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1547683210&Signature=IeCvr0N1gaDRIiDH5Bg8JHWhiC4%3D" width="146" height="152" alt="Andinobates victimatus - in habitat II, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there&#039;s any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how &quot;new&quot; this species is to science, I&#039;m going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We&#039;ve come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco &amp; Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urab&aacute;,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html" title="Andinobates victimatus - full body, Uraba, Colombia"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/59098_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1547683210&Signature=8px3EPjS8A5Hlm516qaGoSvKFlI%3D" width="200" height="142" alt="Andinobates victimatus - full body, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there&#039;s any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how &quot;new&quot; this species is to science, I&#039;m going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We&#039;ve come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco &amp; Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urab&aacute;,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html" title="Andinobates victimatus - side view, Uraba, Colombia"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/59099_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1547683210&Signature=C78Aj9HCDRsIKL2SCUd52pVQI7s%3D" width="200" height="200" alt="Andinobates victimatus - side view, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there&#039;s any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how &quot;new&quot; this species is to science, I&#039;m going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We&#039;ve come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco &amp; Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urab&aacute;,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html" title="Andinobates victimatus - top view, Uraba, Colombia"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/59100_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1547683210&Signature=2MFt9wCMuag8KJoGuVl4gYsZnSU%3D" width="200" height="200" alt="Andinobates victimatus - top view, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there&#039;s any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how &quot;new&quot; this species is to science, I&#039;m going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We&#039;ve come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco &amp; Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urab&aacute;,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html" title="Andinobates victimatus - full body side view, Uraba, Colombia"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/59101_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1547683210&Signature=sPGwejkX5bl238jWfc%2Brgj9PuXY%3D" width="200" height="140" alt="Andinobates victimatus - full body side view, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there&#039;s any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how &quot;new&quot; this species is to science, I&#039;m going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We&#039;ve come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco &amp; Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urab&aacute;,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html" title="Andinobates victimatus - face closeup, Uraba, Colombia"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/59102_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1547683210&Signature=uqLDhfR8Ru28l9QgNp5nR0QV8Go%3D" width="200" height="126" alt="Andinobates victimatus - face closeup, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there&#039;s any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how &quot;new&quot; this species is to science, I&#039;m going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We&#039;ve come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco &amp; Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urab&aacute;,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html" title="Andinobates victimatus - front view, Uraba, Colombia"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/59103_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1547683210&Signature=cydUc%2FocJB4WjfHLohJd7Df19%2BY%3D" width="200" height="114" alt="Andinobates victimatus - front view, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there&#039;s any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how &quot;new&quot; this species is to science, I&#039;m going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We&#039;ve come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco &amp; Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urab&aacute;,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html" title="Andinobates victimatus - front view II, Uraba, Colombia"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/59104_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1547683210&Signature=t7McRVOccbNmDSo7eXh854whV54%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Andinobates victimatus - front view II, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there&#039;s any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how &quot;new&quot; this species is to science, I&#039;m going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We&#039;ve come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco &amp; Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urab&aacute;,World" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html" title="Andinobates victimatus - face closeup II, Uraba, Colombia"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/59105_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1547683210&Signature=tnNAjTHMwd9MeCYj3%2Fkl0QH%2BwQU%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Andinobates victimatus - face closeup II, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there&#039;s any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how &quot;new&quot; this species is to science, I&#039;m going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We&#039;ve come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco &amp; Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urab&aacute;,World" /></a></figure> Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco & Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urabá,World Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Andinobates victimatus - face closeup II, Uraba, Colombia

This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.

The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.

A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there's any weapons there.

So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog.

Given how "new" this species is to science, I'm going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from.

Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We've come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.

Full set:

Andinobates victimatus - in habitat, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there's any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how "new" this species is to science, I'm going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We've come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco & Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urabá,World

Andinobates victimatus - in habitat II, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there's any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how "new" this species is to science, I'm going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We've come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco & Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urabá,World

Andinobates victimatus - full body, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there's any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how "new" this species is to science, I'm going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We've come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco & Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urabá,World

Andinobates victimatus - side view, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there's any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how "new" this species is to science, I'm going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We've come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco & Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urabá,World

Andinobates victimatus - top view, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there's any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how "new" this species is to science, I'm going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We've come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco & Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urabá,World

Andinobates victimatus - full body side view, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there's any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how "new" this species is to science, I'm going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We've come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco & Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urabá,World

Andinobates victimatus - face closeup, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there's any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how "new" this species is to science, I'm going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We've come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco & Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urabá,World

Andinobates victimatus - front view, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there's any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how "new" this species is to science, I'm going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We've come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco & Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urabá,World

Andinobates victimatus - front view II, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there's any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how "new" this species is to science, I'm going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We've come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco & Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urabá,World

Andinobates victimatus - face closeup II, Uraba, Colombia This observation is our main trophy from Uraba, and in many ways of our entire 2017 trip, for both its natural value and its symbolic value. This species is locally endemic to the Northwest of Colombia and had only been described 6 months earlier.<br />
<br />
The symbolic value is in its naming, victimatus, dedicated to the victims of armed conflict in this poor area of Colombia. It also radiates a sense of hope, as the scientist discovering and describing the species is a young Afro-Colombian born in this region. Against all odds, he managed to escape poverty and a lack of opportunity, and turned it into this.<br />
<br />
A few minutes before this observation, we had a strange encounter with illegal goldminers coming our way from the narrow forest path. Some greeted us when passing by, yet one insisted on stopping straight in front of me, and giving me a death stare for a solid 10 seconds. Which I returned. Not a word was said, but they were clearly not happy with our presence, even less so because of our cameras. Continuing, we could see signs of an improvised camp further down the path, and our guide shared that its probably not a good idea to find out if there's any weapons there. <br />
<br />
So we turned around, and whilst walking back I was contemplating in my mind what just happened. An unfortunate non-event, or a life threatening one. That thought was washed away instantly when our guide found this frog. <br />
<br />
Given how "new" this species is to science, I'm going to be generous in sharing many shots. As an ethical disclaimer, we found this frog in the bushes on what looks like a Bromeliad plant. It was located based on its call. However, as the scene was very dark and obscured, our guide picked it up, and then we put it on a large leaf on the forest floor for some better shots. It was then placed back exactly where it came from. <br />
<br />
Personally, we find the symbolic value of this observation the most valuable. We've come to love and deeply respect Colombia and its stunning wildlife and will be going back for a 3rd round later this year. This country deserves a far better reputation than it has, it is awesome, full of potential, and well into its next chapter, one of hope and pride.<br />
<br />
Full set:<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59096/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59097/andinobates_victimatus_-_in_habitat_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59098/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59099/andinobates_victimatus_-_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59100/andinobates_victimatus_-_top_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59101/andinobates_victimatus_-_full_body_side_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59102/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59103/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59104/andinobates_victimatus_-_front_view_ii_uraba_colombia.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/59105/andinobates_victimatus_-_face_closeup_ii_uraba_colombia.html Andinobates victimatus,Antioquia,Colombia,Colombia Choco & Pacific region,South America,Uraba,Urabá,World

    comments (12)

  1. First, this is a stunning shot! And, a breathtaking frog! Congrats on seeing a species so new to science, and such a poignant symbol of hope as well. Second, I'm amazed by the eyes, as usual. They are so black, which makes me wonder the benefit of having plain, black eyes versus the crazy, colorful ones that so many other frogs have. I wonder if, maybe like with humans, dark eye pigment gives protection from light and maybe faster reaction times? Or, maybe it's just a trick of the nictitating membrane. Anyway, absolutely fantastic spotting! Love it! Posted 7 months ago
    1. Thanks a lot for the feedback, Christine!
      These eyes really are black, the darkest I've ever seen. Even with heads-on flash up very close, not even the flash light registers in a significant way. I have no explanation for it, they are like black holes.
      Posted 7 months ago, modified 7 months ago
      1. You're welcome Ferdy! Did it have eyeshine? Posted 7 months ago
        1. I'm sorry, but I don't know what that means? Posted 7 months ago
          1. Lots of nocturnal animals, including frogs have what's called "eyeshine". It's when you see glowing eyes in the dark from deer, frogs, etc. It happens because nocturnal animals have a layer of tissue in their eyes called tapetum lucidum, which helps them see better at night. Human eyes lack this tissue. This special tissue is what produces eyeshine at night. Just wondering if you could see the eyes glow on this frog naturally or after shining a light in it's direction? Posted 7 months ago
            1. Here's a photo from flickr showing eyeshine... https://www.flickr.com/photos/s_schub/4409825095 Posted 7 months ago
              1. Also, my question about eyeshine in this frog just stemmed from my curiosity about their dark eyes. You would expect dark eyes to absorb light better than it reflects light thus producing less eyeshine. Also, animals with the bright eyeshine should technically have more rods and fewer cones in their retinas. This would mean that they have excellent night vision, but most are mostly colorblind. So, most of the cells in their retinas should be rods, rather than cones. Cones detect colors, but rods don't. Better/extra rods should allow nocturnal animals to see better in dim light. Anyway, none of this may make sense, but I was just curious because if the frog doesn't have good eyeshine, then it should have fewer rods and thus not super night vision; or maybe, it could also mean that the frog is not colorblind. But, I'm not an eye or amphibian expert, so who knows - not me ;). Posted 7 months ago
            2. Thanks for explaining, very interesting. No, that's the strange thing, I did not see that eyeshine effect. All of these photo were done with heads-on macro flash at close distance. You can see the light bouncing on several parts of its body. But not its eyes. Just a tiny flare, nothing more. Posted 7 months ago
              1. Fascinating. Posted 7 months ago
  2. Maybe it's just a very wise but unfathomable frog? Probably thinking ' oh well, I've just been discovered, I'll sit here and wait to be put back.....sigh!
    Seriously though, lovely pics and a great explanation. Thank you for sharing.
    Posted 7 months ago
    1. Thanks so much :) Posted 7 months ago
  3. From today's JungleDragon Facebook post:
    "Frog eyes!! Frogs may be well-known for their jumping skills, croaking, and slimy skin, but their eyes are seriously impressive! Eyes are such complex sensory organs, and frog eyes have several characteristics that make them even more amazing! Most frogs have large, bulging eyes that are positioned on top of their heads. The size and position of their eyeballs gives them close to a 360 degree field of view and compensates for their inability to turn their heads. Their eyes also have a nictitating membrane, which is like a semi-transparent eyelid that protects and camouflages their eyes. Frogs have powerful night vision, thanks to a mirror-like layer of tissue behind their retinas, called the tapetum lucidum, which makes their eyes appear to glow in the dark. It helps them see objects in low light. And, if their eyes get damaged, they can regenerate the different structures and self-repair! Amazing! One of the most strangely cool things about frog eyes is that they help with eating. Frogs don't have the muscles needed to chew and swallow their food. So, when a frog swallows, its eyes retract into openings in their skull, push the food down its throat, and help it to swallow! Eyes are amazing organs. Just the fact that all the components in an eyeball work together so that we can see the world around us is astounding! The diversity of frog eye color and patterns, in addition to their special features makes frog eyes truly exceptional. {Credits are in the comments} #JungleDragon"
    Posted 3 days ago

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Andinobates victimatus is a poison dart frog from the Urabá region of Northwestern Colombia. It was first described by Pablo Palacios in 2017. The victimatus name is dedicated to the victims of the armed conflicts plaguing the Urabá region.

Similar species: Frogs
Species identified by fchristant
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By fchristant

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Uploaded Apr 18, 2018. Captured Oct 27, 2017 17:12.
  • NIKON D810
  • f/13.0
  • 1/60s
  • ISO64
  • 105mm