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Lichen of the slowest pace [HDR] My first go at HDR: 3 pictures shot at 100ISO and long exposure times, plus and minus 2 EV, 13sec, 2.5sec,30sec). It&#039;s reindeer lichen, a very slow growing lichen eaten by mainly Reindeer/Caribou.<br />
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This lichen I found while hiking up in Norway with my wife. It is highly protected and it is absolutely forbidden to break off. This loose piece photographed here I found on the ground in a swamp, it was partially eaten. I did not have to break it off, only pick it up, so I was kinda in the clear. <br />
I did not know the reason for it having such a protected state. Years later I read about their very very slow growth rate. <br />
Reindeer lichen is slow growing (only 3&ndash;5 mm per year) and may take decades to return once overgrazed, burned, trampled, or otherwise consumed. This piece is about 4cm in radius, so about 10 years old. I did not know that..<br />
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This piece is about 10 years in my possession now, residing in one of our book shelves. It is battered a bit, discoloured too. I&#039;ll have to make due.  Cladonia rangiferina,Geotagged,HDR,Norway,macro,reindeer lichen,soligor 36mm Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Lichen of the slowest pace [HDR]

My first go at HDR: 3 pictures shot at 100ISO and long exposure times, plus and minus 2 EV, 13sec, 2.5sec,30sec). It's reindeer lichen, a very slow growing lichen eaten by mainly Reindeer/Caribou.

This lichen I found while hiking up in Norway with my wife. It is highly protected and it is absolutely forbidden to break off. This loose piece photographed here I found on the ground in a swamp, it was partially eaten. I did not have to break it off, only pick it up, so I was kinda in the clear.
I did not know the reason for it having such a protected state. Years later I read about their very very slow growth rate.
Reindeer lichen is slow growing (only 3–5 mm per year) and may take decades to return once overgrazed, burned, trampled, or otherwise consumed. This piece is about 4cm in radius, so about 10 years old. I did not know that..

This piece is about 10 years in my possession now, residing in one of our book shelves. It is battered a bit, discoloured too. I'll have to make due.

    comments (18)

  1. Fascinating photo and story Ludo, and cool to see you play with HDR as well. Promoted. Posted 7 years ago
    1. As I was just telling Joost, you and him were the source of trying HDR and really doing it, as I was pondering upon it a pretty long time:)
      Thanks for the inspiration and great examples of HDR:)
      The first macro HDR it is. More coming.
      Posted 7 years ago
  2. I've never thought of using hdr to add contrast to macro images, but it worked out great in this case! Posted 7 years ago
    1. I was inspired by you two, as a matter of fact:) I was planning on doing HDR for a few months now, but I couldn't find the right moment and the right subject. Thanks for your comment! Posted 7 years ago
      1. Just adding some early experiences from my side: as is obvious, producing HDR is ideally done by shooting multiple photos at different exposures. This brings the challenges of avoiding camera and subject movement. Even with a tripod its not easy.

        However, I found that when shooting in RAW you can do HDR from a single image quite well. Here's an example:

        Sri Lankan Leopard portrait  BestZOO,Geotagged,HDR,Panthera pardus kotiya,Sri Lankan Leopard,The Netherlands


        In Lightroom I created two virtual copies, one underexposed, one overexposed. Then I feed the total of 3 photos to Photoshop and play with the HDR settings. I am not exactly sure how to compare 3 actual shots versus 3 virtual shots but in practice it works reasonably well. And the big benefit of course is that you will not suffer from ghosting, since the alignment between virtual copies is perfect.
        Posted 7 years ago, modified 7 years ago
        1. Some people have annoyed me in the past by saying they where doing hdr but actually they where just photoshopping.
          For me hdr is the process of making and using different physical exposures.
          Posted 7 years ago
          1. Some purists left:) hehe:) Posted 7 years ago
        2. I have thought about this approach too, and I guess it should work fine. Three shots in RAW I think will do potentially better, because more details will be captured in the combination of shots. Or at least I think so. The devil is in the details.
          Mine was taken using a tripod (long exposure..) and the software aligns the images (I use Photomatix 4.2.1) . Alignment is interpolation in potential, so that's tricky too.
          You are right in your stating that there is, besides exposure, absolutely no difference in position. So maybe your approach is better.
          I need some sleep:) I'll dream about it, I'm not that sharp anymore:)
          Posted 7 years ago
          1. I want to clarify that my preference is "real" HDR using 3 actual shots. I agree that is more pure and you will getter a bigger dynamic range (I think). However, if you don't have 3 shots, yet still want to increase the dynamic range, the process I described works quite well.

            The discussion of where post processing begins and ends is an old one, and a complicated one. My own stance is that I never change the actual scene, just things like color tone and contrast. Where I deviate, I will mention it. However, I can entirely appreciate other perspectives as well, from ultra pure to unlimited post processing. It entirely depends on what you try to achieve.
            Posted 7 years ago
          2. Here are some definitive answers on how single-image RAW HDR compares to multi-shot HDRs:

            http://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/23910/is-there-any-reason-to-take-3-raw-jpg-images-to-get-most-from-hdr?newsletter=1&nlcode=45109|4128

            Short summary: multiple shots captures a lot more dynamic range, and is therefore better. Single image HDR is the next best thing if you simply don't have multiple shots.
            Posted 7 years ago
  3. The last week I did not really have the time for JD, the coming days are (too) busy too, so be patient all:) Have fun in the long run! Posted 7 years ago
    1. Take your time, Ludo. We miss you but we know you'll be back. You can't resist :) Posted 7 years ago
      1. Grin, hehe;) Posted 7 years ago
  4. Hi Ferdy, as to the Purist remark, do not feel offended. I don't. Sometimes my images are pure, most of the times they have been digitally processed a little, sometimes they have been post processed a lot. I bet the best pictures on this (or any other) site are heavily post processed most of the times (if not all) for sure.
    That's a major positive issue in the age of digital processing.
    I bet it went just the same in the old photofilm age of legend..
    Posted 7 years ago
    1. I fully agree, and also post process almost all my photos, even if just a little. And yes, even in the old age of film it is impossible to produce a photo without post processing. Posted 7 years ago
  5. As described a long while ago, these lichen are symbiont. Star Trek rules;)
    Read more about it in:
    A trekkies dream: the mutual symbiant In the northern regions, like Norway, this reindeer lichen is the main source of food for wild reindeer. It is a protected lichen and forbidden to pick or take home for us humans. It grows with a rate of only 3 to 5 mm each year. First I did not understand why it had to be protected, but now I understand: when trampled or picked it will takes 10s and 10s of years for it to reach adulthood again.. <br />
The interesting part is that it is not a 'single entity' but a combination. It is a mutual of a type of fungus and an algae: the combination is called 'thallus'. Cladonia rangiferina,Geotagged,Norway,algae,lichen,protected,symbiant
    Posted 7 years ago
  6. (Ferdy, nice to see this pic as a Wildlife thumb for Fungi, and Sac Fungi which sounds like my last name and thus is pretty cool too:)) Posted 7 years ago
  7. Thanks Ferdy as to your explaination of multiple vs single RAW shots. It confirms what my gut feeling told me. So in a minute there will be another multiple shot HDR. Posted 7 years ago

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''Cladonia rangiferina'', also known as reindeer lichen , lat., is a light-colored, fruticose lichen belonging to the Cladoniaceae family. It grows in both hot and cold climates in well-drained, open environments. Found primarily in areas of alpine tundra, it is extremely cold-hardy.

Other common names include reindeer moss and caribou moss, but these names may be misleading since it is not a moss. As the common names suggest, reindeer lichen is an important food for reindeer , and has.. more

Similar species: Lecanorales
Species identified by Ludo Sak
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By Ludo Sak

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jun 4, 2012. Captured Jun 4, 2012 21:44 in Kvarmavegen 45, 5713 Vossestrand, Norway.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • f/11.0
  • 12s
  • ISO100
  • 50mm