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Cubaris sp. possibly tenuipunctata A woodlouse in the family Armadillidae, genus Cubaris. From original descriptions of species found in the region at large, this might be Cubaris tenuipunctata - with a little fantasy the two antero-median tubercles on the first tergite can just about be discerned. The pantropical Cubaris murina would seem to be more convex (not as "flattened" laterally) and C. depressa should carry more tubercles on the hind edges of the first tergites. There may be some other enigmatic candidates though (C.margarita?) that I don't have a proper idea about - or an as yet undescribed species (Oniscidea research for the region seems to leave room for improvement ;o) Armadillidae,Cubaris,Cubaris cf. tenuipunctata,Fall,Geotagged,Isopoda,Oniscidea,Trinidad and Tobago,green,leaf,macro,nature,pink,purple,segments,shell,wildlife Click/tap to enlarge

Cubaris sp. possibly tenuipunctata

A woodlouse in the family Armadillidae, genus Cubaris. From original descriptions of species found in the region at large, this might be Cubaris tenuipunctata - with a little fantasy the two antero-median tubercles on the first tergite can just about be discerned. The pantropical Cubaris murina would seem to be more convex (not as "flattened" laterally) and C. depressa should carry more tubercles on the hind edges of the first tergites. There may be some other enigmatic candidates though (C.margarita?) that I don't have a proper idea about - or an as yet undescribed species (Oniscidea research for the region seems to leave room for improvement ;o)

    comments (1)

  1. Howdy,
    Excellent to see images of such "exotic" (for me) woodlice here! :o)

    This is NOT Armadillidium vulgare, but some Pill Woodlouse from a different family (not Armadillidiidae), maybe Armadillidae or some such (not my forté and I don't know woodlice from that region).

    Updated status: Armadillidae, almost certainly Cubaris sp., quite possibly Cubaris tenuipunctatus

    Please remove/add tags accordingly so that the image may (not) be displayed in the (in)correct galleries.

    Notes to self:
    1) In the region s.l. maybe Ethelum americanum or E. reflexum (Eubelidae) or Cubaris depressa, margaritae, murina(!) ... ???
    2) Okay, it's NOT an Eubelidae (location of exopodites), so that pretty much just leaves us with Cubaris spp (Armadillidae)
    3) C.depressa http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/31200385 should have tubercles on pereon tergites; other than that the name sounds tempting ... the animal is quite "flattend". If the images that I can find for murina are identified correctly, that species should be much more clearly convex.
    4) Going by Jass & Klausmeier (2006) and the original description by Dolfuss Cubaris tenuipunctatus is a good candidate, known from quite close by.
    https://decapoda.nhm.org/pdfs/30354/30354.pdf
    http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/31200384
    It is quite hard to discern, but I think I can even make out the two antero-median tubercles on the first tergite :o)
    This seems to be the best fit so far.
    I would suggest tagging this Cubaris cf. tenuipunctata for now, or whatever other way you folk prefer to tag uncertain IDs ?
    Posted one year ago, modified one year ago

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By haylo

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Uploaded Dec 14, 2015. Captured Oct 30, 2015 10:14 in Tucker Valley Road, Trinidad and Tobago.
  • PENTAX K-50
  • f/16.0
  • 1/180s
  • ISO800
  • 300mm