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I've had a long day.. Anopheles - this genus of mosquito was first described and named in the year 1818 by J. W. Meigen. There are an estimated 400 different species of these, among which 100 are capable of transmitting the human Malaria. Only about 30 - 40 of these species transmit the parasites of the genus &quot;Plasmodium&quot;, which causes Malaria in humans in endemic areas.<br />
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The insect in the image is a Male Anopheles mosquito, which, as opposed to its female counter-part, does not feed on mammalian blood. Instead, it feeds on nectar from flowers. Males are easily identifiable with the help of a strong magnifying glass, and even with the naked eyes if you have good eye-sight. They have wider and hairy probosis (feeding tube) than that of a female&#039;s. Also, their antennae are very hairy (yet attractive), as seen in the image.<br />
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Adult males and females rest with their abdomens sticking up in the air rather than parallel to the surface on which they are resting. Although the male&#039;s life-span is about a week, it lives long enough to mate with a female of its species, which lives for around 2 weeks max. in the wild. The female lays anywhere from 50 - 200 eggs per oviposition. Anopheles,Bangalore,Geotagged,India,Summer,fly,insect,male,mosquito Click/tap to enlarge

I've had a long day..

Anopheles - this genus of mosquito was first described and named in the year 1818 by J. W. Meigen. There are an estimated 400 different species of these, among which 100 are capable of transmitting the human Malaria. Only about 30 - 40 of these species transmit the parasites of the genus "Plasmodium", which causes Malaria in humans in endemic areas.

The insect in the image is a Male Anopheles mosquito, which, as opposed to its female counter-part, does not feed on mammalian blood. Instead, it feeds on nectar from flowers. Males are easily identifiable with the help of a strong magnifying glass, and even with the naked eyes if you have good eye-sight. They have wider and hairy probosis (feeding tube) than that of a female's. Also, their antennae are very hairy (yet attractive), as seen in the image.

Adult males and females rest with their abdomens sticking up in the air rather than parallel to the surface on which they are resting. Although the male's life-span is about a week, it lives long enough to mate with a female of its species, which lives for around 2 weeks max. in the wild. The female lays anywhere from 50 - 200 eggs per oviposition.

    comments (6)

  1. Great shot! Sorry, can't create a new species for Anopheles, it's too generic, a genus instead of a species. Posted 7 years ago
    1. Thank you. I don't think I'll be able to figure out the exact species of this mosquito.

      Wouldn't it be better if we could categorize such generic images to their respective genus at least? I mean, we could then categorize the "unidentified" images as per their genus, if not their exact species. I'm Just curious..
      Posted 7 years ago, modified 7 years ago
      1. That idea in itself is fine, but it's way too complex to implement in the current setup, sorry. For now, using tags is the alternative. Posted 7 years ago
        1. Fair enough. Tags are surely an easier alternative. Posted 7 years ago
          1. Thank you for understanding :) Posted 7 years ago
            1. You are welcome :) Posted 7 years ago

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By Avinash Krishnamurthy

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Uploaded Sep 18, 2015. Captured Sep 4, 2015 18:34 in 5th Cross Rd, MEI Colony, Phase 3, Peenya, Bengaluru, Karnataka 560058, India.
  • Canon EOS 60D
  • 1/250s
  • ISO100
  • 50mm