JungleDragon is a nature and wildlife community for photographers, travellers and anyone who loves nature. We're genuine, free, ad-free and beautiful.

Join

Wild Black Raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) Another view of the same plant: <figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/75588/wild_black_raspberry_rubus_occidentalis.html" title="Wild Black Raspberry (Rubus occidentalis)"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/1559/75588_thumb.JPG?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1587600010&Signature=eDAUUZqTLy3%2BDaw%2Bgv4IZM%2B2jAc%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Wild Black Raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) Another view of the same plant as here: https://www.jungledragon.com/image/31440/rubus_occidentalis.html Angiospermae,Black raspberry,Flowering Plant,Geotagged,Nature,Plant,Rosaceae,Rosales,Rubus,Rubus occidentalis,United States" /></a></figure> Angiospermae,Black raspberry,Flowering Plant,Geotagged,Nature,Plant,Rosaceae,Rosales,Rubus,Rubus occidentalis,United States Click/tap to enlarge

    comments (5)

  1. The rounded fruit and the absence of glandular hairs on the petioles lead me to think this may not be Rubus strigosus. Posted one year ago
    1. The source I used to identify this back in 2015 gave me the (incorrect) impression that there was only one Rubus native to the NE US, so I didn't spend much time checking the ID. The differences between the different Rubus species are a bit beyond my abilities in ID-ing plants (especially not without being able to go back and take additional looks at the plant at different times of the year, which I can't do since I'm no longer in NY). My best guess now would be Rubus occidentalis, but I'm definitely not especially confident with that ID.

      Here's another view of the plant if that would help you (or anyone else) more confidently identify the plant:
      Wild Black Raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) Another view of the same plant as here: https://www.jungledragon.com/image/31440/rubus_occidentalis.html Angiospermae,Black raspberry,Flowering Plant,Geotagged,Nature,Plant,Rosaceae,Rosales,Rubus,Rubus occidentalis,United States
      Posted one year ago, modified one year ago
      1. Note: I used https://gobotany.newenglandwild.org/dkey/rubus/ to help me decide on my new best guess of Rubus occidentalis. Posted one year ago
        1. Hi Joe, my first impression after looking at your photo was also Rubus occidentalis. There are a lot of Rubus species in New England and the rest of North America as well as the rest of the world. They can be confusing and the taxonomy isn't fully settled on many species groups (subgenera).

          Go Botany is a good online source. I got a little off track with the fruit colors since these are red not black as in the key but the other red-fruited species did not match this one so I assumed the fruits were not ripe. That led me to Rubus occidentalis. I also looked up the species on Minnesota Wildflowers https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/shrub/black-raspberry for more help.

          I'll change the species id if you don't mind or you can go ahead and change it. Don't know if there's a page for it yet, though.
          Posted one year ago
          1. I've changed the species ID - thanks for the help, and nice catch on the mis-ID. Posted one year ago

Sign in or Join in order to comment.

''Rubus occidentalis'' is a species of ''Rubus'' native to eastern North America. Its common name black raspberry is shared with the closely related western American species ''Rubus leucodermis''. Other names occasionally used include wild black raspberry, black caps, black cap raspberry, thimbleberry, and scotch cap.

''Rubus occidentalis'' is a deciduous shrub growing to 2–3 m tall, with prickly shoots. The leaves are pinnate, with five leaflets on leaves, strong-growing stems in their.. more

Similar species: Rosales
Species identified by Joe Spandrusyszyn
View Joe Spandrusyszyn's profile

By Joe Spandrusyszyn

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jul 10, 2015. Captured in Tinker Nature Park Boardwalk, Pittsford, NY 14534, USA.
  • NEX-6
  • f/5.6
  • 1/250s
  • ISO800
  • 0.00786163mm