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Curculio glandium This insect has so many peculiar features but I think my favorite is that long "nose" with that funny twin antenna, I wonder what are those antenna for...  Acorn weevil,Curculio glandium,Fall,Geotagged,Portugal,insect Click/tap to enlarge PromotedCountry intro

Curculio glandium

This insect has so many peculiar features but I think my favorite is that long "nose" with that funny twin antenna, I wonder what are those antenna for...

    comments (5)

  1. I love it. The nose (rostrum) is for piercing food (acorns), the antennae I would expect to be used to sense and navigate the environment. Posted one month ago
  2. Their rostrum is quite amazing! It's super strong, but also very flexible. They are made of alternating layers of hard and soft material, which are arranged in a helix pattern (like DNA). Strong enough to drill through an acorn, but flexible so it won't break! Perfect.

    After drilling a hole in an acorn, she lays her eggs in the hole and plugs it with excrement. The acorn eventually self-heals the wound. The larvae eat the inner part of the nut, and then chew a tiny escape hole through which they squeeze. The hole is so small that the larva struggles to squirm and wiggle its plump little body through the opening. Once free, it buries itself in the soil, pupates, and waits to metamorphize into an adult weevil.

    Here's a video of a larva squeezing out of an acorn:


    Probably too much information, lol. But, weevils are so cool!
    Posted one month ago
    1. Great photo, btw! Posted one month ago
    2. Wow, that's incredible. Thanks for this great piece of knowledge ;-) Posted one month ago
      1. You're welcome! Posted one month ago

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''Curculio glandium'' is a species of carpophagus weevil, known as the acorn weevil. It is native to eastern North America. It eats by a rostrum, an elongated snout, that is used for piercing. Male/Female differentiation can be determined using the rostrum as female's are longer. The larvae are short, and cylindrical in shape, and move by means of ridges on the underside of the body. Adults can reach a length of 4 to 8 mm.

Similar species: Beetles
Species identified by Flavio
View Flavio's profile

By Flavio

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Uploaded Oct 29, 2021. Captured Oct 1, 2021 08:33 in Unnamed Road, 8150, 8150, Portugal.
  • X-T20
  • f/1.0
  • 1/180s
  • ISO800
  • 100mm