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Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis - Danaus plexippus This chrysalis was dead and had a hole in its side. The most likely cause of death was tiny, parasitic chalcid wasps. <br />
<br />
These wasps lay eggs in soft chrysalises. They do this by following caterpillars that are about to pupate, and then laying eggs in the new chrysalis. The wasp larvae eat the insides of the chrysalis, and then emerge as adults. <br />
<br />
I took the chrysalis home to dissect, but found only brown goo on the inside.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Garden<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121248/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html" title="Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis - Danaus plexippus"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/121248_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1678320010&Signature=rzh3ypu6lWuu4TjgAYTJAwqQSqk%3D" width="140" height="152" alt="Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis - Danaus plexippus This photo shows some interesting anatomical features. First, it&#039;s a female, which is determined by looking at the area below the cremaster (black &#039;stick&#039; attached to silk). If there is a vertical line between/underneath the bottom two black dots, then the chrysalis has a female monarch. This one has that vertical line and thus was a female. The head is located at the bottom of the chrysalis and the line that goes down the center is the proboscis. The dark, upside down V shape are the antennae. The areas to the left and right (with gold dots) are the wings.<br />
<br />
<br />
This chrysalis was dead and had a hole in its side. The most likely cause of death was tiny, parasitic chalcid wasps.<br />
<br />
These wasps lay eggs in soft chrysalises. They do this by following caterpillars that are about to pupate, and then laying eggs in the new chrysalis. The wasp larvae eat the insides of the chrysalis, and then emerge as adults.<br />
<br />
I took the chrysalis home to dissect, but found only brown goo on the inside.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Garden<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121248/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121251/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_with_labels_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121250/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121249/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html Danaus plexippus,Geotagged,Monarch butterfly,Summer,United States" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121251/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_with_labels_-_danaus_plexippus.html" title="Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis (with labels) - Danaus plexippus"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/121251_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1678320010&Signature=X2t8EGefdFZmUoQQUaUWz06PV9I%3D" width="140" height="152" alt="Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis (with labels) - Danaus plexippus This photo shows some interesting anatomical features. First, it&#039;s a female, which is determined by looking at the area below the cremaster (black &#039;stick&#039; attached to silk). If there is a vertical line between/underneath the bottom two black dots, then the chrysalis has a female monarch. This one has that vertical line and thus was a female. The head is located at the bottom of the chrysalis and the line that goes down the center is the proboscis. The dark, upside down V shape are the antennae. The areas to the left and right (with gold dots) are the wings.<br />
<br />
This chrysalis was dead and had a hole in its side. The most likely cause of death was tiny, parasitic chalcid wasps.<br />
<br />
These wasps lay eggs in soft chrysalises. They do this by following caterpillars that are about to pupate, and then laying eggs in the new chrysalis. The wasp larvae eat the insides of the chrysalis, and then emerge as adults.<br />
<br />
I took the chrysalis home to dissect, but found only brown goo on the inside.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Garden<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121248/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121251/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_with_labels_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121250/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121249/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html Danaus plexippus,Geotagged,Monarch butterfly,Summer,United States" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121250/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html" title="Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis - Danaus plexippus"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/121250_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1678320010&Signature=sysKvxNT7ONYh58r5UC91MboOJ0%3D" width="200" height="154" alt="Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis - Danaus plexippus This chrysalis was dead and had a hole in its side. The most likely cause of death was tiny, parasitic chalcid wasps.<br />
<br />
These wasps lay eggs in soft chrysalises. They do this by following caterpillars that are about to pupate, and then laying eggs in the new chrysalis. The wasp larvae eat the insides of the chrysalis, and then emerge as adults.<br />
<br />
I took the chrysalis home to dissect, but found only brown goo on the inside.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Garden<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121248/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121251/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_with_labels_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121250/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121249/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html Danaus plexippus,Geotagged,Monarch butterfly,Summer,United States" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121249/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html" title="Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis - Danaus plexippus"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/121249_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1678320010&Signature=TOWthoq7jZ9I%2BtFt43Dt6d9hL5Y%3D" width="132" height="152" alt="Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis - Danaus plexippus This chrysalis was dead and had a hole in its side. The most likely cause of death was tiny, parasitic chalcid wasps. <br />
<br />
These wasps lay eggs in soft chrysalises. They do this by following caterpillars that are about to pupate, and then laying eggs in the new chrysalis. The wasp larvae eat the insides of the chrysalis, and then emerge as adults. <br />
<br />
I took the chrysalis home to dissect, but found only brown goo on the inside.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Garden<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121248/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121251/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_with_labels_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121250/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121249/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html Danaus,Danaus plexippus,Geotagged,Monarch,Monarch butterfly,Summer,United States,chalcid wasp,chrysalis,parasitized chrysalis,pupa" /></a></figure> Danaus,Danaus plexippus,Geotagged,Monarch,Monarch butterfly,Summer,United States,chalcid wasp,chrysalis,parasitized chrysalis,pupa Click/tap to enlarge

Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis - Danaus plexippus

This chrysalis was dead and had a hole in its side. The most likely cause of death was tiny, parasitic chalcid wasps.

These wasps lay eggs in soft chrysalises. They do this by following caterpillars that are about to pupate, and then laying eggs in the new chrysalis. The wasp larvae eat the insides of the chrysalis, and then emerge as adults.

I took the chrysalis home to dissect, but found only brown goo on the inside.

Habitat: Garden

Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis - Danaus plexippus This photo shows some interesting anatomical features. First, it's a female, which is determined by looking at the area below the cremaster (black 'stick' attached to silk). If there is a vertical line between/underneath the bottom two black dots, then the chrysalis has a female monarch. This one has that vertical line and thus was a female. The head is located at the bottom of the chrysalis and the line that goes down the center is the proboscis. The dark, upside down V shape are the antennae. The areas to the left and right (with gold dots) are the wings.<br />
<br />
<br />
This chrysalis was dead and had a hole in its side. The most likely cause of death was tiny, parasitic chalcid wasps.<br />
<br />
These wasps lay eggs in soft chrysalises. They do this by following caterpillars that are about to pupate, and then laying eggs in the new chrysalis. The wasp larvae eat the insides of the chrysalis, and then emerge as adults.<br />
<br />
I took the chrysalis home to dissect, but found only brown goo on the inside.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Garden<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121248/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121251/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_with_labels_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121250/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121249/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html Danaus plexippus,Geotagged,Monarch butterfly,Summer,United States

Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis (with labels) - Danaus plexippus This photo shows some interesting anatomical features. First, it's a female, which is determined by looking at the area below the cremaster (black 'stick' attached to silk). If there is a vertical line between/underneath the bottom two black dots, then the chrysalis has a female monarch. This one has that vertical line and thus was a female. The head is located at the bottom of the chrysalis and the line that goes down the center is the proboscis. The dark, upside down V shape are the antennae. The areas to the left and right (with gold dots) are the wings.<br />
<br />
This chrysalis was dead and had a hole in its side. The most likely cause of death was tiny, parasitic chalcid wasps.<br />
<br />
These wasps lay eggs in soft chrysalises. They do this by following caterpillars that are about to pupate, and then laying eggs in the new chrysalis. The wasp larvae eat the insides of the chrysalis, and then emerge as adults.<br />
<br />
I took the chrysalis home to dissect, but found only brown goo on the inside.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Garden<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121248/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121251/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_with_labels_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121250/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121249/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html Danaus plexippus,Geotagged,Monarch butterfly,Summer,United States

Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis - Danaus plexippus This chrysalis was dead and had a hole in its side. The most likely cause of death was tiny, parasitic chalcid wasps.<br />
<br />
These wasps lay eggs in soft chrysalises. They do this by following caterpillars that are about to pupate, and then laying eggs in the new chrysalis. The wasp larvae eat the insides of the chrysalis, and then emerge as adults.<br />
<br />
I took the chrysalis home to dissect, but found only brown goo on the inside.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Garden<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121248/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121251/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_with_labels_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121250/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121249/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html Danaus plexippus,Geotagged,Monarch butterfly,Summer,United States

Parasitized Monarch Chrysalis - Danaus plexippus This chrysalis was dead and had a hole in its side. The most likely cause of death was tiny, parasitic chalcid wasps. <br />
<br />
These wasps lay eggs in soft chrysalises. They do this by following caterpillars that are about to pupate, and then laying eggs in the new chrysalis. The wasp larvae eat the insides of the chrysalis, and then emerge as adults. <br />
<br />
I took the chrysalis home to dissect, but found only brown goo on the inside.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Garden<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121248/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121251/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_with_labels_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121250/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/121249/parasitized_monarch_chrysalis_-_danaus_plexippus.html Danaus,Danaus plexippus,Geotagged,Monarch,Monarch butterfly,Summer,United States,chalcid wasp,chrysalis,parasitized chrysalis,pupa

    comments (2)

  1. Great shot as well Posted one year ago
    1. Thanks, Niel. Posted one year ago

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The monarch butterfly or simply monarch is a milkweed butterfly in the family Nymphalidae. Other common names depending on region include milkweed, common tiger, wanderer, and black veined brown. It may be the most familiar North American butterfly, and is considered an iconic pollinator species.

Similar species: Moths And Butterflies
Species identified by Christine Young
View Christine Young's profile

By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Sep 4, 2021. Captured Sep 4, 2021 11:03 in 281 Main St S, Woodbury, CT 06798, USA.
  • Canon EOS 90D
  • f/5.0
  • 1/166s
  • ISO100
  • 100mm