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Ballooning wolf spiderling Between the silvery outer edges and tips of native Eremophila nivea, I came upon this tiny male spiderling in the process of ballooning. Hardly bigger than a pinhead. He made several attempts, but eventually disappeared so perhaps he was successful at getting further afield. <br />
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Ballooning is a process by which spiders move through the air by releasing one or more gossamer threads to catch the wind. This causes them to become airborne at the mercy of both air and electric currents. Moments such as this remind me of the frailty of life and what others are dealing with. Yet these tiny life forms soldier on. <br />
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 Australia,Geotagged,Lycosidae,Winter,arachnid,arthropod,fauna,invertebrate,macro,new south wales,spider ballooning,spiderling Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Ballooning wolf spiderling

Between the silvery outer edges and tips of native Eremophila nivea, I came upon this tiny male spiderling in the process of ballooning. Hardly bigger than a pinhead. He made several attempts, but eventually disappeared so perhaps he was successful at getting further afield.

Ballooning is a process by which spiders move through the air by releasing one or more gossamer threads to catch the wind. This causes them to become airborne at the mercy of both air and electric currents. Moments such as this remind me of the frailty of life and what others are dealing with. Yet these tiny life forms soldier on.

    comments (5)

  1. Great info Ruth Posted one year ago
    1. Glad you enjoyed, thanks Niel. Posted one year ago
  2. Where a spider ends up indeed seems such an act of randomness, a numbers game. Posted one year ago
    1. The basis of all nature, chance and randomness. It's incredible that these characters have been found several miles high in the atmosphere and out at sea. I read somewhere that they've been observed in research to 'steer' using their front legs. Posted one year ago
  3. I love this photo Ruth, and the text is so beautifully written. Very well done indeed ^_^ Posted one year ago

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By Ruth Spigelman

Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives
Uploaded Aug 24, 2021. Captured Aug 19, 2021 14:50 in 59 Merewether St, Merewether NSW 2291, Australia.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/16.0
  • 10/2500s
  • ISO250
  • 105mm