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Ozyptila sp., extreme macro, Netherlands Whilst playing with our cat in the backyard, I noticed some movement in the grass, a tiny crab spider. Unusually small compared to how I normally find them, and I wasn&#039;t expecting them on the ground. This one I roughly estimate at 4-6mm wide for the abdomen, so without legs.<br />
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I sacrificed this one. To repeat my earlier take on this: I prefer to use arthropods found dead (about 75% of cases), yet sacrifice on an exceptional basis, within moderation. Only if it&#039;s a species not done before, or if the subject is meaningful or promising. And I will always disclose it.<br />
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Technically, I&#039;m pleased with the result, which doesn&#039;t happen a lot when it comes to extreme macro. The interesting &quot;making of&quot; note for this one is that I used a tunnel diffuser. Which is a very fancy way of saying that I enclosed the subject entirely with a paper cup, and then aimed my flash unit directy to the outside of the cup. The paper texture causes soft spread light, yet due to the shape of the cup, light also bounces inside of the cup, in all directions. Altogether, this creates a relatively soft and even light in all directions.<br />
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It&#039;s a delicate process for me to pull this off currently. Positioning the cup without touching anything else is stressful, but once done, you lose focus light. There&#039;s almost no distance between the front of the lens and the beginning of the cup, so hardly any way to get any preview light in there. Therefore, everything needs to be ready, calculated and programmed before taking this step.<br />
<br />
Ways around this would be to have a very strong permanent light next to the cup, to at least have *some* preview light. Or, to have the cup placement procedure be more repeatable, in some permanent position where it always lands in the same spot. I&#039;ll explore that.<br />
<br />
Back on point, ultimately the point of all of it is the subject, not the process. I find it delightfully unsettling. Should have posted it for Halloween.<br />
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As for species, I expect it is in the Ozyptila genus. This genus has relatively dull crab spiders and most are only a few mm in size.  Extreme Macro,Netherlands,WeMacro Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Ozyptila sp., extreme macro, Netherlands

Whilst playing with our cat in the backyard, I noticed some movement in the grass, a tiny crab spider. Unusually small compared to how I normally find them, and I wasn't expecting them on the ground. This one I roughly estimate at 4-6mm wide for the abdomen, so without legs.

I sacrificed this one. To repeat my earlier take on this: I prefer to use arthropods found dead (about 75% of cases), yet sacrifice on an exceptional basis, within moderation. Only if it's a species not done before, or if the subject is meaningful or promising. And I will always disclose it.

Technically, I'm pleased with the result, which doesn't happen a lot when it comes to extreme macro. The interesting "making of" note for this one is that I used a tunnel diffuser. Which is a very fancy way of saying that I enclosed the subject entirely with a paper cup, and then aimed my flash unit directy to the outside of the cup. The paper texture causes soft spread light, yet due to the shape of the cup, light also bounces inside of the cup, in all directions. Altogether, this creates a relatively soft and even light in all directions.

It's a delicate process for me to pull this off currently. Positioning the cup without touching anything else is stressful, but once done, you lose focus light. There's almost no distance between the front of the lens and the beginning of the cup, so hardly any way to get any preview light in there. Therefore, everything needs to be ready, calculated and programmed before taking this step.

Ways around this would be to have a very strong permanent light next to the cup, to at least have *some* preview light. Or, to have the cup placement procedure be more repeatable, in some permanent position where it always lands in the same spot. I'll explore that.

Back on point, ultimately the point of all of it is the subject, not the process. I find it delightfully unsettling. Should have posted it for Halloween.

As for species, I expect it is in the Ozyptila genus. This genus has relatively dull crab spiders and most are only a few mm in size.

    comments (19)

  1. Amazing,but just think what would happen if it would be bigger. Posted 14 days ago
    1. Hah exactly. I imagine its prey to see something like this. Posted 14 days ago
  2. Interesting process. I really like the lighting and think it worked out great. And, the subject is awesome! It looks sleepy. Posted 14 days ago
    1. Thanks! Posted 14 days ago
  3. Not your chin then, Ferdy?? Amazing technique! Posted 14 days ago
    1. After 7 months of working from home, it's pretty close, I admit :)

      I think it's one of the extra unsettling aspects of the image, the color comes quite close to human skin, of white people that is.
      Posted 14 days ago
      1. I wasn't trying to be rude, but the colour was a pointer. Stay safe! Posted 14 days ago
        1. No worries, I can take a joke, also very brutal ones, and this one is mild at best. Remember, I'm dutch. Posted 14 days ago
          1. Cheers, I thought you'd take it in the manner it was meant! Hope all's well Posted 14 days ago
  4. Truly spectacular! Posted 14 days ago
    1. Thanks, Chun! Posted 13 days ago
  5. Bless! He’s so cute! Posted 12 days ago
  6. Today's Facebook post:

    For everyone that has always wondered what the face of a crab spider looks like under extreme macro magnification, your wait is over! Behold, the adorable, scruffy face of an Ozyptila sp. crab spider! These spiders are somewhat drab and are only a few millimeters in size, but their faces are unforgettable. {Spotted in the Netherlands by JungleDragon founder, Ferdy Christant} #JungleDragon #Ozyptila #Crabspider #Extrememacro

    Not only did Ferdy create JungleDragon, but he is an avid nature lover, photographer, and traveler! Check more of his photos: https://www.jungledragon.com/user/2/popular

    https://www.facebook.com/jungledragonwildlife
    Posted 9 days ago
    1. Thanks for this post! Posted 9 days ago
      1. You're welcome! I love this photo and am impressed by all the work you put into this! Posted 9 days ago
  7. You've surprised me with this superb macro Ferdy, breath-taking mate. Posted 9 days ago
    1. The only good thing coming from COVID, I guess. Thanks! Posted 9 days ago
  8. Incredibly beautiful recording Posted 8 days ago
    1. Thank you, Mike! Posted 8 days ago

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By Ferdy Christant

All rights reserved
Uploaded Nov 10, 2020. Captured Sep 25, 2020 22:12.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/1.2
  • 1/640s
  • ISO64
  • 50mm