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Mother wolf spider on the run I&#039;m always concerned to see the panic when I inadvertently disturb a creature while gardening - I did just that today when busy digging up lawn for a new bed. A mother wolf spider with her precious egg sac attached was running everywhere trying to find a new place to hide. <br />
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After a couple of quick shots, I helped her to cover and safety, well out of the way of my shovel. <br />
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15 mm body length Araneae,Australia,Geotagged,Lycosidae,Tasmanicosa leuckartii,Winter,Wolf Spider,arachnid,arthropod,fauna,invertebrate,new south wales,spider egg sac Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Mother wolf spider on the run

I'm always concerned to see the panic when I inadvertently disturb a creature while gardening - I did just that today when busy digging up lawn for a new bed. A mother wolf spider with her precious egg sac attached was running everywhere trying to find a new place to hide.

After a couple of quick shots, I helped her to cover and safety, well out of the way of my shovel.

15 mm body length

    comments (5)

  1. Great photo, and proper ethical behavior, well done!

    I do want to double-check the identification, even if not a spider expert myself:
    https://bie.ala.org.au/species/urn:lsid:biodiversity.org.au:afd.taxon:2333fbb1-10df-43ad-9adb-257094f9ded1#gallery

    From this link, all photos of this species seem radically different from yours: much bigger, very wide thorax, specific pattern on the abdomen. I fail to see the resemblance, to be honest.

    I could be wrong of course, may I know how you came to the ID?
    Posted 2 years ago
    1. Up until yesterday, I'd been classifying these as Lycosa (now Tasmanicosa) godeffroyii, but happened to see on the Find-a-spider Guide T.leuckartii and the female in particular looked much similar. I'm open to suggestion. I think we can agree they are wolf spiders lol.
      http://www.findaspider.org.au/find/spiders/413.htm
      Posted 2 years ago
      1. Definitely a wolf spider!

        It reminds me of spiders in the pardosa genus:
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pardosa

        It has hundreds of species, many looking near-identical to each other, almost impossible to identify without checking genitals. Many in that genus look similar to your photo, yet not sure if yours also is in this genus.

        For now, I hope you agree it's not certain enough to keep this ID. In some categories of wildlife, visual similarity is not unique enough to precisely ID it, there's nothing we can do about it.

        Don't worry in any case, it's just an ID. The photo and experience are wonderful regardless.
        Posted 2 years ago
        1. Agree. In which case I have a couple of other garden wolfs that probably have the incorrect ID as well. Posted 2 years ago
          1. You mean existing ones already posted? When in doubt you can always delete the identification yourself. Let me know if you need any help. Posted 2 years ago

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By Ruth Spigelman

All rights reserved
Uploaded Aug 26, 2020. Captured Aug 26, 2020 11:57 in 10 Perina Pl, Merewether Heights NSW 2291, Australia.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/14.0
  • 10/2500s
  • ISO250
  • 105mm