Keeled Indian Mabuya

Eutropis carinata

The Keeled Indian Mabuya , also called Many-keeled Grass Skink, Golden Skink, and Brahminy Skink, is a species of skink found in South Asia.
The Keeled Indian Mabuya also called Many-keeled Grass Skink or (ambiguously) "golden skink"..

They are fast & quick.. I never thought that I will be able to make shot like this.. 
Its a skink..
Whenever I've spotted a skink on my movement it used to disappear immediately moving quickly in burrows..

In this case It was wierd as I saw it basking on this rock & i Decided ti approach it knowing that Its a useless attempt but I got proved wrong this time.. and I was able to make few shots of this skink. Asia,D5200,Eutropis carinata,India,Indian,Keeled Indian Mabuya,Nikon,NikonD5200,animal,animals,fauna,incredible india,incredibleindia,keeled,life,nature,reptile,reptiles,reptilia,scales

Appearance

Snout moderate, obtuse. Lower eyelid scaly. Nostril behind vertical of suture between rostral and first labial; no postnasal; anterior loreal usually shorter and deeper than the second, in contact with the first labial; frontonasal broader than long, usually in contact with the rostral, and frequently also with the frontal; latter as long as the frontoparietals and interparietal together or shorter, in contact with the second supraocular ; 4 supraoculars, second largest; usually 6 supraciliaries, first largest; frontoparietals distinct, larger than the interparietal, which entirely separates the parietals; a pair of nuchals ; 4 labials anterior to the subocular, which is large and not narrower below. Ear-opening roundish, subtriangular, as large as a lateral scale or smaller, without or with a few very indistinct lobules anteriorly. Dorsal, nuchal, and lateral scales more or less strongly tri- or quinquecarinate; 30 to 34 scales round the middle of the body, subequal. The hind limb reaches the wrist or the elbow of the adpressed fore limb. Sub digital lamellae smooth. Scales on upper surface of tibia mostly bicarinate. Tail 1.5 to 1.8 times length of head and body. Brown or olive-brown above, uniform or with small black spots or longitudinal lines; sides darker, with or without lighter spots; a light dorso-latexal band begins on the supraciliaries; lower surfaces yellowish . In the breeding-season males have a scarlet band from the shoulder to the thigh.

From snout to vent 5 inches; tail 9.5.
Lizard  Eutropis carinata,Eutropis macularia,Fall,Geotagged,India,Keeled Indian Mabuya,lizard

Distribution

India , Bangladesh, Maldives, Sri Lanka, Nepal.
Juvenile of Keeled Indian Mabuya. Again got lucky.. After my first skink shot, I went to Karnala Bird Sanctuary, Raigad, Maharashtra, India.
And to my surprise within few mins I saw two juveniles playing with each other.. When I got little close, one Disappeared in the thick leaf-litter, and this one freezed its movement. Allowed me too approach too close.. I was waiting that it'll flickr its tongue and I could get a nice shot.. but it wasn't moving at all. 
So left it alone after couple of shots.. and few scratches on elbows & knees.. ;-) Bird,Eutropis carinata,Fauna,IncredibleIndia,India,Indian,Karnala,Keeled,Keeled Indian Mabuya,Life,Mabuya,Maharashtra,Nature,Raigad,Reptile,Sanctuary,Serpent,Skink,Wild,WildLife

Habitat

Sri Lanka subspecies ''lankae'' are encountered in many habitat types, from rain forests and deserts to scrub forests and parks and gardens of houses ad cities.
Diurnal, and terrestrial, frequently seen basking or foraging in open areas. Crickets, caterpillars, beetles, and earthworms and even small vertebrates are known to consume.
'Skink' time Its quite tough to spot these guys, especially when they are up on a tree. Eutropis carinata,Keeled Indian Mabuya

Reproduction

Clutches of 2-20 eggs are laid at a time in a self-excavated hole or under fallen logs, between August and September. Eggs are measuring 11 * 17mm. Hatchlings emerge between May and June, measure 12-12.5mm.
Lurking in the shadows Tough to spot this guy.   Eutropis carinata,Keeled Indian Mabuya

Food

Sri Lanka subspecies ''lankae'' are encountered in many habitat types, from rain forests and deserts to scrub forests and parks and gardens of houses ad cities.
Diurnal, and terrestrial, frequently seen basking or foraging in open areas. Crickets, caterpillars, beetles, and earthworms and even small vertebrates are known to consume.

References:

Some text fragments are auto parsed from Wikipedia.

Taxonomy
KingdomAnimalia
DivisionChordata
ClassReptilia
OrderSquamata
FamilyScincidae
GenusEutropis
SpeciesE. carinata
Photographed in
India