Flap-necked chameleon

Chamaeleo dilepis

The flap-necked chameleon is a species of arboreal chameleon native to sub-Saharan Africa.
Flap-Necked Chameleon Just before the rainy season in ZImbabwe, baby flap-necked chameleons start to hatch and explore. I was lucky enough to find one close to my home in Harare and photograph it. Chamaeleo dilepis,Fall,Flap-Necked Chameleon,Geotagged,Harare,Zimbabwe

Appearance

This species is a large chameleon, reaching 35 cm . Colouring ranges through various shades of green, yellow, and brown. There is usually a pale stripe on the lower flanks and one to three pale patches higher on the flanks.
Flap-necked Chameleon-2 See previous photo - within a few minutes this little fellow almost completely changed color before my eyes from a lovely greenish pattern to almost black with greenish yellow spots. It was due to agitation at being helped across the street.
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/49409/flap-necked_chameleon-1.html Chamaeleo dilepis,Geotagged,Namibia,Spring,flap necked chameleon,namibia,waterberg

Distribution

This species has a very wide distribution, occurring throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa from as far north as Ethiopia and Somalia to a western extreme of Cameroon, and as far south as northern South Africa. It inhabits coastal forest, moist or dry savannah, woodland and bushy grasslands, and may also venture into rural and suburban areas.
Journey Across the Sand A flap-necked chameleon working its way across a sand dune in Machangulo, Southern Mozambique Chamaeleo dilepis,Flap-Necked Chameleon,Geotagged,Mozambique,Summer

Status

The flap-necked chameleon is in heavy demand for the international pet trade, being the third most highly traded chameleon species. More than 111,000 individuals were exported between 1977 and 2011, mostly to the USA. No detrimental effects on the total population size have been observed so far, although more in-depth studies have been recommended. The species is currently classified as Least Concern by the IUCN.
Flap-Necked Chameleon I found this baby flap-necked chameleon just before the first rains of the season. I put a small grasshopper on the end of the stick it was on to give it a distraction (and a snack) before taking this photo. Chamaeleo dilepis,Fall,Flap-Necked Chameleon,Geotagged,Zimbabwe,juvenile

Habitat

This species has a very wide distribution, occurring throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa from as far north as Ethiopia and Somalia to a western extreme of Cameroon, and as far south as northern South Africa. It inhabits coastal forest, moist or dry savannah, woodland and bushy grasslands, and may also venture into rural and suburban areas.The flap-necked chameleon lays 10-40 eggs in a hole dug in soil, which take 10–12 months to hatch. Food includes a variety of invertebrates, although large individuals may take geckos and other chameleons. The species is itself commonly preyed on by snakes such as the boomslang and the twig snake.

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Taxonomy
KingdomAnimalia
DivisionChordata
ClassReptilia
OrderSquamata
FamilyChamaeleonidae
GenusChamaeleo
SpeciesC. dilepis