Upland chorus frog

Pseudacris feriarum

The upland chorus frog is a species of chorus frog found in the United States. It was recently separated from the Western chorus frog, , being identified as an individual species rather than a subspecies.
Upland Chorus Frogs (Pseudacris feriarum) Mating couple in a shallow puddle (with larvae) on a dirt road in a clearing in a dense mixed hardwood/coniferous forest in NW Georgia (Gordon County), US. March 18, 2018.

The spawn of this lovely pair were, hopefully, saved during our rescue mission this past spring! All spawn in these vernal pools were relocated to new puddles during road repairs!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mbJvYhqlgFA&t=2s
 Geotagged,Pseudacris feriarum,United States,Upland chorus frog,Winter

Appearance

Upland chorus frogs are usually brown, grey-brown, or reddish-brown in color, with darker blotching. They grow from 0.75–1.5 inches in size.
Upland Chorus Frog (Pseudacris feriarum) Near porch lights in an overgrown backyard habitat in NW Georgia (Gordon County), US.
 Geotagged,Pseudacris feriarum,Summer,United States,Upland chorus frog

Distribution

Found in the southern and eastern United States, the upland chorus frog is found from the state of New Jersey to the Florida panhandle; west to eastern Texas and southeast Oklahoma.

Status

The upland chorus frog is listed as a protected species in the state of New Jersey, primarily due to habitat destruction. Because of its restrictive habitat preferences, this species is declining in several states, particularly in areas where roadside ditches and other ephemeral pools are being drained or destroyed for new developments.

Behavior

Upland chorus frogs are secretive, nocturnal frogs, and are rarely seen except immediately after rains. They are an almost entirely terrestrial species, and found in a variety of habitats, but usually moderately moist, vegetated areas, not far from a permanent water source. Like most frogs, they are insectivorous. Breeding occurs throughout the year, but most frequently during the cooler, more rainy periods from November to March. Eggs are laid in clusters of 60 or so, in water and attached to vegetation. The female can lay upwards of 1,000 eggs at a time.

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Status: Least concern | Trend: Stable
EX EW CR EN VU NT LC
Taxonomy
KingdomAnimalia
DivisionChordata
ClassAmphibia
OrderAnura
FamilyHylidae
GenusPseudacris
SpeciesP. feriarum