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Wollemi pine These pines are some of the world&#039;s oldest and rarest trees. The evolutionary line was thought to be extinct, discovered in 1994 by David Noble, an officer with the NSW National Parks &amp; Wildlife Service in the Wollemi National Park here in Australia. The grouping was discovered in a deep, narrow canyon. <br />
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This was a fascinating and very exciting find. Since there are so few specimens in the wild, a thorough management strategy has been developed to protect them and they were afforded extra protection during last summer&#039;s horrendous wild fires. Having Wollemi pines in homes, gardens and parks worldwide is safeguarding the species from becoming extinct and decreases the threat of unauthorised visits to the wild population - young specimens have been available for the public to purchase from our botanic gardens since April 2006.<br />
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Closest relatives are Kauri and Norfolk Island, Hoop, Bunya Bunya and Monkey Puzzle pines. <br />
<br />
 Araucariaceae,Australia,Flora,Geotagged,Pinales,Tree,Winter,Wollemi pine,Wollemia,Wollemia nobilis,botany,new south wales,tree Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Wollemi pine

These pines are some of the world's oldest and rarest trees. The evolutionary line was thought to be extinct, discovered in 1994 by David Noble, an officer with the NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service in the Wollemi National Park here in Australia. The grouping was discovered in a deep, narrow canyon.

This was a fascinating and very exciting find. Since there are so few specimens in the wild, a thorough management strategy has been developed to protect them and they were afforded extra protection during last summer's horrendous wild fires. Having Wollemi pines in homes, gardens and parks worldwide is safeguarding the species from becoming extinct and decreases the threat of unauthorised visits to the wild population - young specimens have been available for the public to purchase from our botanic gardens since April 2006.

Closest relatives are Kauri and Norfolk Island, Hoop, Bunya Bunya and Monkey Puzzle pines.

    comments (2)

  1. Oh wow! Thank you for sharing this with us!

    They are truly beautiful trees. I would love to see them one day!
    Posted 11 days ago
    1. Pleasure Lisa. The original site is just 70 km west from where I live, but it's location within the massive national park so secret and guarded, I think most public (including me), like the idea of leaving them in peace. I'm happy to delight in specimens such as this at the Sydney Botanic Garden. There's another 'secret insurance population' that has been planted in the Blue Mountains to help ensure the species survival. Posted 10 days ago

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''Wollemia'' is a genus of coniferous tree in the family Araucariaceae. ''Wollemia'' was only known through fossil records until the Australian species ''Wollemia nobilis'' was discovered in 1994 in a temperate rainforest wilderness area of the Wollemi National Park in New South Wales, in a remote series of narrow, steep-sided sandstone gorges 150 km north-west of Sydney. The genus is named for the National Park.

Similar species: Pinales
Species identified by Ruth Spigelman
View Ruth Spigelman's profile

By Ruth Spigelman

All rights reserved
Uploaded Aug 1, 2020. Captured Jul 19, 2020 09:55 in The Domain - Phillip Precinct, 1 Art Gallery Rd, Sydney NSW 2000, Australia.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/10.0
  • 10/2500s
  • ISO320
  • 40mm