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Trypoxylon figulus - frontal, Heesch, Netherlands Meet Trypoxylon figulus, in dutch named the &quot;Pottenbakkerswesp&quot; =&gt; Pot bakery wasp. <br />
<br />
These tiny wasps (8-15mm) don&#039;t bake pots yet may visit insect/bee hotels. Initially I figured it to be a sawfly or other parasite, going for the bees. Instead, it&#039;s simply a resident of the hotel. They hunt for tiny spiders and stuff their room in the hotel with as many as they can, for their offspring. The finishing touch is a layer of clay, to seal the hole. Pot baked.<br />
<br />
Some people have documented both males and females completing the sealing, which is highly unusual for wasps where males do absolutely nothing for their offspring. Males are born much earlier than the female, as soon as the females exits her nest of birth, she&#039;s immediately overwhelmed by males wishing to mate.<br />
<br />
Their venomous sting is described as to almost instantly paralyze the spider. It needs to be this strong as this wasp is not immune to the spider&#039;s bite.<br />
<br />
It&#039;s in dutch, but this excellent article has many photos of their life cycle, scroll down to &quot;pottenbakkerwesp&quot;.<br />
<br />
<a href="https://www.bestuivers.nl/Portals/5/Publicaties/Bijengasten_Hoofdstukken/Bijenhotelgasten_h18.pdf" rel="nofollow">https://www.bestuivers.nl/Portals/5/Publicaties/Bijengasten_Hoofdstukken/Bijenhotelgasten_h18.pdf</a><br />
<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/96778/trypoxylon_figulus_-_full_body_heesch_netherlands.html" title="Trypoxylon figulus - full body, Heesch, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/96778_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1605744010&Signature=LOytK5CKNAJJYENtF02VHh4bJP4%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Trypoxylon figulus - full body, Heesch, Netherlands Meet Trypoxylon figulus, in dutch named the &quot;Pottenbakkerswesp&quot; =&gt; Pot bakery wasp. <br />
<br />
These tiny wasps (8-15mm) don&#039;t bake pots yet may visit insect/bee hotels. Initially I figured it to be a sawfly or other parasite, going for the bees. Instead, it&#039;s simply a resident of the hotel. They hunt for tiny spiders and stuff their room in the hotel with as many as they can, for their offspring. The finishing touch is a layer of clay, to seal the hole. Pot baked.<br />
<br />
Some people have documented both males and females completing the sealing, which is highly unusual for wasps where males do absolutely nothing for their offspring. Males are born much earlier than the female, as soon as the females exits her nest of birth, she&#039;s immediately overwhelmed by males wishing to mate.<br />
<br />
Their venomous sting is described as to almost instantly paralyze the spider. It needs to be this strong as this wasp is not immune to the spider&#039;s bite.<br />
<br />
It&#039;s in dutch, but this excellent article has many photos of their life cycle, scroll down to &quot;pottenbakkerwesp&quot;.<br />
<br />
https://www.bestuivers.nl/Portals/5/Publicaties/Bijengasten_Hoofdstukken/Bijenhotelgasten_h18.pdf<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/96777/trypoxylon_figulus_-_frontal_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/96779/trypoxylon_figulus_-_venomous_sting_heesch_netherlands.html Extreme Macro,Trypoxylon figulus" /></a></figure><br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/96779/trypoxylon_figulus_-_venomous_sting_heesch_netherlands.html" title="Trypoxylon figulus - venomous sting, Heesch, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/96779_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1605744010&Signature=kpXLCiwnLHWDqIF9qcn7MdqmxcM%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Trypoxylon figulus - venomous sting, Heesch, Netherlands Meet Trypoxylon figulus, in dutch named the &quot;Pottenbakkerswesp&quot; =&gt; Pot bakery wasp. <br />
<br />
These tiny wasps (8-15mm) don&#039;t bake pots yet may visit insect/bee hotels. Initially I figured it to be a sawfly or other parasite, going for the bees. Instead, it&#039;s simply a resident of the hotel. They hunt for tiny spiders and stuff their room in the hotel with as many as they can, for their offspring. The finishing touch is a layer of clay, to seal the hole. Pot baked.<br />
<br />
Some people have documented both males and females completing the sealing, which is highly unusual for wasps where males do absolutely nothing for their offspring. Males are born much earlier than the female, as soon as the females exits her nest of birth, she&#039;s immediately overwhelmed by males wishing to mate.<br />
<br />
Their venomous sting is described as to almost instantly paralyze the spider. It needs to be this strong as this wasp is not immune to the spider&#039;s bite.<br />
<br />
It&#039;s in dutch, but this excellent article has many photos of their life cycle, scroll down to &quot;pottenbakkerwesp&quot;.<br />
<br />
https://www.bestuivers.nl/Portals/5/Publicaties/Bijengasten_Hoofdstukken/Bijenhotelgasten_h18.pdf<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/96777/trypoxylon_figulus_-_frontal_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/96778/trypoxylon_figulus_-_full_body_heesch_netherlands.html Extreme Macro,Trypoxylon figulus,WeMacro" /></a></figure> Extreme Macro,Trypoxylon figulus,WeMacro Click/tap to enlarge Species introCountry intro

Trypoxylon figulus - frontal, Heesch, Netherlands

Meet Trypoxylon figulus, in dutch named the "Pottenbakkerswesp" => Pot bakery wasp.

These tiny wasps (8-15mm) don't bake pots yet may visit insect/bee hotels. Initially I figured it to be a sawfly or other parasite, going for the bees. Instead, it's simply a resident of the hotel. They hunt for tiny spiders and stuff their room in the hotel with as many as they can, for their offspring. The finishing touch is a layer of clay, to seal the hole. Pot baked.

Some people have documented both males and females completing the sealing, which is highly unusual for wasps where males do absolutely nothing for their offspring. Males are born much earlier than the female, as soon as the females exits her nest of birth, she's immediately overwhelmed by males wishing to mate.

Their venomous sting is described as to almost instantly paralyze the spider. It needs to be this strong as this wasp is not immune to the spider's bite.

It's in dutch, but this excellent article has many photos of their life cycle, scroll down to "pottenbakkerwesp".

https://www.bestuivers.nl/Portals/5/Publicaties/Bijengasten_Hoofdstukken/Bijenhotelgasten_h18.pdf

Trypoxylon figulus - full body, Heesch, Netherlands Meet Trypoxylon figulus, in dutch named the "Pottenbakkerswesp" => Pot bakery wasp. <br />
<br />
These tiny wasps (8-15mm) don't bake pots yet may visit insect/bee hotels. Initially I figured it to be a sawfly or other parasite, going for the bees. Instead, it's simply a resident of the hotel. They hunt for tiny spiders and stuff their room in the hotel with as many as they can, for their offspring. The finishing touch is a layer of clay, to seal the hole. Pot baked.<br />
<br />
Some people have documented both males and females completing the sealing, which is highly unusual for wasps where males do absolutely nothing for their offspring. Males are born much earlier than the female, as soon as the females exits her nest of birth, she's immediately overwhelmed by males wishing to mate.<br />
<br />
Their venomous sting is described as to almost instantly paralyze the spider. It needs to be this strong as this wasp is not immune to the spider's bite.<br />
<br />
It's in dutch, but this excellent article has many photos of their life cycle, scroll down to "pottenbakkerwesp".<br />
<br />
https://www.bestuivers.nl/Portals/5/Publicaties/Bijengasten_Hoofdstukken/Bijenhotelgasten_h18.pdf<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/96777/trypoxylon_figulus_-_frontal_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/96779/trypoxylon_figulus_-_venomous_sting_heesch_netherlands.html Extreme Macro,Trypoxylon figulus

Trypoxylon figulus - venomous sting, Heesch, Netherlands Meet Trypoxylon figulus, in dutch named the "Pottenbakkerswesp" => Pot bakery wasp. <br />
<br />
These tiny wasps (8-15mm) don't bake pots yet may visit insect/bee hotels. Initially I figured it to be a sawfly or other parasite, going for the bees. Instead, it's simply a resident of the hotel. They hunt for tiny spiders and stuff their room in the hotel with as many as they can, for their offspring. The finishing touch is a layer of clay, to seal the hole. Pot baked.<br />
<br />
Some people have documented both males and females completing the sealing, which is highly unusual for wasps where males do absolutely nothing for their offspring. Males are born much earlier than the female, as soon as the females exits her nest of birth, she's immediately overwhelmed by males wishing to mate.<br />
<br />
Their venomous sting is described as to almost instantly paralyze the spider. It needs to be this strong as this wasp is not immune to the spider's bite.<br />
<br />
It's in dutch, but this excellent article has many photos of their life cycle, scroll down to "pottenbakkerwesp".<br />
<br />
https://www.bestuivers.nl/Portals/5/Publicaties/Bijengasten_Hoofdstukken/Bijenhotelgasten_h18.pdf<br />
<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/96777/trypoxylon_figulus_-_frontal_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/96778/trypoxylon_figulus_-_full_body_heesch_netherlands.html Extreme Macro,Trypoxylon figulus,WeMacro

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Trypoxylon figulus is a wasp in the Crabronidae family. All Trypoxylon species that have been studied so far are active hunters of spiders, which they paralyse with a venomous sting, to provide as food to their developing larvae.

Species identified by Ferdy Christant
View Ferdy Christant's profile

By Ferdy Christant

All rights reserved
Uploaded Jun 28, 2020. Captured Jun 12, 2020 22:21.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/1.2
  • 1/100s
  • ISO400
  • 50mm