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Beneath the stars, or so to say An Elven-maid there was of old,<br />
    A shining star by day:<br />
Her mantle white was hemmed with gold,<br />
    Her shoes of silver-grey.<br />
<br />
A star was bound upon her brows,<br />
    A light was on her hair<br />
As sun upon the golden boughs<br />
In Lorien the fair.  Geotagged,Ligustrum ovalifolium,The Netherlands,frost,night,north,star,stars,startrail,trail Click/tap to enlarge Species introCountry intro

Beneath the stars, or so to say

An Elven-maid there was of old,
A shining star by day:
Her mantle white was hemmed with gold,
Her shoes of silver-grey.

A star was bound upon her brows,
A light was on her hair
As sun upon the golden boughs
In Lorien the fair.

    comments (17)

  1. (part of one of the greater poems of fantastic JRR Tolkien)
    I shot this at night last night. It was freezing at around -10 degrees Celcius. The total length of this shooting was 3h20 minutes. After about 2h10 my lens front started to freeze over:) The 60D was packed in towels, so less damage there. My tripod only missed a few icicles, I picked it up with gloves as not to be stuck to it:) Did not try to lick it either:)

    The shot you see here is a combination of 245 shots of a total of 375. The rest showed to much frost!

    Nice thing though: I shot it with our precious North Star in the middle, well almost in the middle. Difficult that is, and given the length of the shot and the window of opportunity of a clear sky once in a few weeks...:)

    Exif: f3.5, 400iso, 30second chained shots.

    I will uload the timelapse of Jack Frost climbing up my lens..
    Posted 6 years ago, modified 6 years ago
  2. @Ferdy: sorry man, it was way to cold to migrate to forest scenery for a few hours. They'd have found me in the woods by now:) So another heaven dotted in delight, shot from my back garden. Not your average JD shot, yet it shows a bit of Ligustrum, first identification of this species. That is something too:)

    Grtz,

    Ludo

    still so little time at hand, yet we struggle on:)
    Posted 6 years ago
    1. Wow 245 shots for one photo. See it printed next week? ;-) Posted 6 years ago
    2. Absolutely no need to apologize, Ludo. As beautiful as the scenery is during these cold days, it's too cold for me to be outside for such a long time. Deep respect that you did this, risking your gear even.

      I'd promote the image but unfortunately the homepage image can only show landscape oriented photos.
      Posted 6 years ago, modified 6 years ago
      1. Absolutely no need to apologize, Ferdy, same there:) Thank you for wanting to promote it, I like that a lot! I understand the reason, normally I do keep this in mind when talking a JD shot, yet in this case the contrast of scenery needed to be there. No worries, maybe in the next release! Posted 6 years ago
        1. JungleDragon III can promote any image of any aspect ratio :) Posted 6 years ago
    3. Ludo, your stargazing photos are really impressive, but you have identified this one as a Ligustrum species. Since this is still the only photo of the species, do you have a more representative one of the plant itself?
      The question is, is it really Ligustrum vulgare or Ligustrum ovalifolium, which is an introduced species, more commonly used for hedges? Are the leaves long and narrow or rather elliptical?
      Posted 5 years ago
      1. Hi WF, thnx for your comment on the impressiveness;) Hey, maybe I truly am mistaken abut the Ligustrum, I'll comment here again with a decent shot of the plant by reasonable daylight after work. What the heck, I'll get a flashlight and describe them for you: coming up in a minute.. Posted 5 years ago
          1. Thanks, Ludo, that was a quick response. These leaves look quite rounded so more likely to be a Ligustrum ovalifolium. It is also more likely to remain evergreen. You can compare the shape of the leaves of the two species here
            http://www.irishwildflowers.ie/pages-trees/t-35.html
            http://www.irishwildflowers.ie/pages-trees/t-34.html
            Posted 5 years ago, modified 5 years ago
      2. You are right, it is the 'Ligustrum ovalifolium' as the leaves do not resemble the photos on the link you provided. I stand corrected, for which I thank you. Posted 5 years ago
        1. Great, now that we got this right, I can introduce a wild Ligustrum vulgare ;)
          Nevertheless, it would be good if you could upload another photo of this species, whenever appropriate to do it justice.
          Posted 5 years ago
  3. Bet on it, I had to defrost my camera for about two hours. Tripod too:) How's the progress on your side? Short period and difficult subject, challenge it is!:) Posted 6 years ago
    1. I took a few photos outside, but also a few inside because I'm a shivery ("koukleum"). But not ready yet....

      Indeed short period and a challenging subject. Saw your office yesterday (had no camera with me so no photos from the city of light this time).
      Posted 6 years ago
      1. Same for my shots. Great ideas, if only I had more time. Still at the office at the moment, long evening ahead and no camera either:) Posted 6 years ago
  4. Great !!!!!!!!!!!! Posted 6 years ago
    1. Thanks E! Posted 6 years ago

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''Ligustrum ovalifolium'', also known as oval-leaved privet, is a semi-evergreen shrub in the privet genus ''Ligustrum''. The species is native to Japan. It is sometimes known as Japanese privet, but is not to be confused with ''Ligustrum japonicum'' which may also be called by this common name.

''L. ovalifolium'' is the species familiar in the United Kingdom as the most common hedging plant in cultivation.

The plant flowers in midsummer, the abundant white blooms producing.. more

Similar species: Lamiales
Species identified by Ludo Sak
View Ludo Sak's profile

By Ludo Sak

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Uploaded Jan 23, 2013. Captured in Heugterbroekdijk 2, 6003 RB Weert, The Netherlands.