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Cape Sundew recovery, Heesch, Netherlands This is a single shot 2.5x macro of a Cape Sundew, almost 3 weeks after the initial purchase. In this better state, leafs are upright and new leafs are growing. The plant is doing very well. When subjected to my &quot;care&quot; whilst thriving means it&#039;s solid, robust. <br />
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The photo also shows the light potential of this subject, it basically consists of thousands of mirrors. Cape Sundew,Drosera capensis,Europe,Heesch,Netherlands,World Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Cape Sundew recovery, Heesch, Netherlands

This is a single shot 2.5x macro of a Cape Sundew, almost 3 weeks after the initial purchase. In this better state, leafs are upright and new leafs are growing. The plant is doing very well. When subjected to my "care" whilst thriving means it's solid, robust.

The photo also shows the light potential of this subject, it basically consists of thousands of mirrors.

    comments (25)

  1. Nice, do you grow carnivorous plants Ferdy? Posted one year ago
    1. Hardly, I just bought 3 potted plants as subjects for extreme macro :) Posted one year ago
      1. Ahh! We've just had the 1st rain - If you have to use tap water, if you let it stand for a couple of days the chlorine etc. dissipates Posted one year ago
        1. Oh really, never knew that, that's a very useful tip. What about chalk? There seems to be a lot of it in the water here. Posted one year ago
          1. Sundews are acid lovers, which is why they developed the taste for meat - insects - to get nutrients that they would otherwise not have available to them, in wet acidic soils. So I don't suppose they'll be used to alkaline water - I have a sarracenia & it only gets rainwater but I have a butt fed from the roof so I can handle a couple of months without rain. cheers ;¬) Posted one year ago
            1. I need such a permanent solution too! Posted one year ago
  2. This is a fantastic shot! I'm glad they are doing well. What did you end up doing about water - rain water? I'm using distilled. Posted one year ago
    1. Nothing yet, it hasn't seriously rained in 5-6 weeks here. They seem to be OK so far, but perhaps I'm slowly killing them. I should get bottled water, but the problem is that they're seriously thirsty. Posted one year ago
      1. My sundew is sitting in a shallow bowl with about 4 cm of distilled water. But, the dirt in the pot is constantly soaking wet. I would have expected it to dry out a bit like my normal plants do, but it is sucking up water like crazy. Posted one year ago
        1. I think that is normal, they are swamp plants. Lots of water, no nutrition. Posted one year ago
          1. Makes sense. Hope you get rain! We have had tons of rain. I can mail you some ;P. Posted one year ago
            1. My attempts are cursed, Henriette is laughing to my face. 3 times today we had a huge shower, I put a bucket outside and it immediately stops. No kidding. Then it seemed to work on the 4th attempt. Then Spyke went outside and tipped over my bucket. Posted one year ago
              1. Oh no! I can't help but laugh though! Spyke exerts his male dominance once again.

                You could keep the bucket outside permanently, no? My Mom has a rain barrel (it's kind of big though) in her yard -- the rainwater gets in, but no insects can. Then, you can use the water in your garden whenever you need it.
                Posted one year ago
  3. Today's Facebook post:

    The Cape sundew (Drosera capensis) is a remarkable carnivorous plant! Native to the Cape in South Africa, it flowers in summer, producing up to 50 tiny flowers that are able to self-pollinate.

    One of the most intriguing features of this plant is its ability to lure, capture, and digest insects! First, it lures prey with the glistening, beautiful, digestive secretions that cover the sensitive tentacles on the leaves. These secretions visually capture an insect’s attention and also act as a chemical attractant. Insects get stuck in the secretions and the leaf slowly rolls up thanks to a process called thigmotropism, which is a mechanical response to stimuli. Once trapped, the prey gets digested by the plant. Fascinating and ingenious! {Photo credit: JungleDragon founder, Ferdy Christant} #JungleDragon #CapeSundew #Sundew #Droseracapensis

    https://www.facebook.com/jungledragonwildlife/
    Posted one year ago
    1. Thanks so much for this post :) Posted one year ago
      1. You're welcome! This photo is really beautiful and ethereal. I love it! Posted one year ago
  4. You did well Ferdy, great shot. Posted one year ago
    1. Thanks, Paul! Posted one year ago
  5. Beautifully photographed!!! Loved it! Posted one year ago
    1. Thanks! A few more extreme closeups here:
      https://www.jungledragon.com/specie/6722/photos
      Posted one year ago
  6. Have just bought a couple to eat the fruit flies!!
    Posted one year ago
    1. Nice! Same species? Posted one year ago
    1. Nice! Looks like you got the nice red one, mine is quite pale. Posted one year ago
      1. Yes indeed and they're doing a great job catching the flies Posted one year ago

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''Drosera capensis'', commonly known as the Cape sundew, is a small rosette-forming carnivorous species of perennial sundew native to the Cape in South Africa. Because of its size, easy to grow nature, and the copious amounts of seed it produces, it has become one of the most common sundews in cultivation.

Similar species: Pinks, Cactuses, And Allies
Species identified by Ferdy Christant
View Ferdy Christant's profile

By Ferdy Christant

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 29, 2020. Captured Apr 18, 2020 22:01.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/11.0
  • 1/13s
  • ISO400
  • 105mm