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Callery Pear, filament and anthers, Heesch, Netherlands This is a macro stack from an individual flower of a tree that grows in our garden: Pyrus calleryana Decne. During early spring, it produces several thousands of small flowers, about 2cm in size.<br />
<br />
The funny thing about this stack is the making of. I was having my best friend Barry over, showing him my new stacking gear. Demonstrating a stack is very time confusing because of all the steps involved:<br />
<br />
- composition and specimen preparation<br />
- step length calculation<br />
- rail positioning<br />
- several lighting tests<br />
- running the stack<br />
- stacking the images<br />
<br />
Not wanting to bore him out, I half-assed all steps. I put the thing on a clam, did nothing regarding lighting, just dialed in a gut feeling number, and ran the stack. While it ran, we did nothing to avoid vibration.<br />
<br />
Through sheer luck, this careless stack turned out pretty well. Acceptably sharp, no stacking mistakes where background objects protrude into the foreground, and hardly any halos.<br />
<br />
Life lesson: don&#039;t try so hard.<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/92865/callery_pear_full_flower_heesch_netherlands.html" title="Callery Pear, full flower, Heesch, Netherlands"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/2/92865_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1605744010&Signature=KM4mbegVxU4%2F0Jzm58rZP%2Bn55bY%3D" width="200" height="136" alt="Callery Pear, full flower, Heesch, Netherlands This is the full flower of Pyrus calleryana, diameter about 2cm, a single tree producing thousands in spring. <br />
<br />
This is a limited stack at 2.5 x macro. It is technically quite good as you can zoom in quite deeply for additional detail, which is hard to accomplish at higher magnifications. <br />
<br />
There&#039;s one stacking issue not immediately visible but I&#039;ll tell you where it is: the right anther is floating in mid-air :)<br />
<br />
Also, the pure black background is not great for this type of subject, hoping to solve this in the future.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/92863/callery_pear_filament_and_anthers_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/92864/callery_pear_anthers_heesch_netherlands.html Callery Pear,Extreme Macro,Pyrus calleryana" /></a></figure> Callery Pear,Extreme Macro,Pyrus calleryana Click/tap to enlarge Country intro

Callery Pear, filament and anthers, Heesch, Netherlands

This is a macro stack from an individual flower of a tree that grows in our garden: Pyrus calleryana Decne. During early spring, it produces several thousands of small flowers, about 2cm in size.

The funny thing about this stack is the making of. I was having my best friend Barry over, showing him my new stacking gear. Demonstrating a stack is very time confusing because of all the steps involved:

- composition and specimen preparation
- step length calculation
- rail positioning
- several lighting tests
- running the stack
- stacking the images

Not wanting to bore him out, I half-assed all steps. I put the thing on a clam, did nothing regarding lighting, just dialed in a gut feeling number, and ran the stack. While it ran, we did nothing to avoid vibration.

Through sheer luck, this careless stack turned out pretty well. Acceptably sharp, no stacking mistakes where background objects protrude into the foreground, and hardly any halos.

Life lesson: don't try so hard.

Callery Pear, full flower, Heesch, Netherlands This is the full flower of Pyrus calleryana, diameter about 2cm, a single tree producing thousands in spring. <br />
<br />
This is a limited stack at 2.5 x macro. It is technically quite good as you can zoom in quite deeply for additional detail, which is hard to accomplish at higher magnifications. <br />
<br />
There's one stacking issue not immediately visible but I'll tell you where it is: the right anther is floating in mid-air :)<br />
<br />
Also, the pure black background is not great for this type of subject, hoping to solve this in the future.<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/92863/callery_pear_filament_and_anthers_heesch_netherlands.html<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/92864/callery_pear_anthers_heesch_netherlands.html Callery Pear,Extreme Macro,Pyrus calleryana

    comments (5)

  1. I love the term "time confusing" you just introduced! :o) Posted 6 months ago
    1. Oh wow, didn't see that. It's almost as good as my other recent one: you can't make an egg without breaking an omelette. Posted 6 months ago
      1. Ah yes :o) My favorite switcheroo is: "Iemand dood maken met een blij vogeltje"
        But "time confusing" has a metaphoric subtlety all in its own league... I propose a definition along these lines:

        "Discrepancy in the perception of time between two or more participants in the same event where part of people present are so much more consumed emotionally or attention wise that they seem to experience another time flow than the one perceived by more innocent bystanders, causing confusion over the progress of time."
        Posted 6 months ago
        1. I love it, it seems to build on Einstein's work. I'll see the new Wikipedia article coming. Posted 6 months ago
          1. Ahw, I'll gladly leave that for others once your invention goes viral :o) Posted 6 months ago

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''Pyrus calleryana'', or the Callery pear, is a species of pear tree native to China and Vietnam, in the family Rosaceae. It is most commonly known for its cultivar 'Bradford', widely planted throughout the United States and increasingly regarded as an invasive.

Similar species: Rosales
Species identified by Ferdy Christant
View Ferdy Christant's profile

By Ferdy Christant

All rights reserved
Uploaded Apr 20, 2020. Captured Mar 21, 2020 11:50.
  • NIKON D850
  • f/1.2
  • 1/50s
  • ISO640
  • 50mm