JungleDragon is a nature and wildlife community for photographers, travellers and anyone who loves nature. We're genuine, free, ad-free and beautiful.

Join

A Female Peruvian Racket-tail at Feeder Recently split from the booted Racket-tail, it can be distinguished by the tan "boots" or fine feathers on the leg (making it look like it is wearing Wellington boots). The females do not sport the long tail extensions for which these hummingbirds get their name, the extensions end in large round panes that supposedly look like tennis rackets. Ecuador,Geotagged,Ocreatus peruanus,Peruvian racket-tail,San Isidro,Summer Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

A Female Peruvian Racket-tail at Feeder

Recently split from the booted Racket-tail, it can be distinguished by the tan "boots" or fine feathers on the leg (making it look like it is wearing Wellington boots). The females do not sport the long tail extensions for which these hummingbirds get their name, the extensions end in large round panes that supposedly look like tennis rackets.

    comments (3)

  1. is so beautiful! Posted one year ago
    1. You should see the male! Hummingbirds are just so cool - amazing colors, unparalleled flight ability (as far as I know, no other bird can fly backwards), capable of flying non-stop over the Gulf of Mexico, and many that live in the mountains "hibernate" every evening - lowering their metabolism to conserve energy. Posted one year ago
      1. I checked online and he has indeed this lovely tail!
        I also love hummingbirds, they are indeed so unique in so many ways..so small and fragile and yet so strong and resilient! ..and let's not foget: so colorful! Gems of the rainforest :-)
        Posted one year ago, modified one year ago

Sign in or Join in order to comment.

The Peruvian racket-tail is a species of hummingbird. It is found on the east slope of the Andes in Ecuador and northeastern Peru. It previously was considered conspecific with the white-booted racket-tail and the rufous-booted racket-tail, together called the booted racket-tail. In fact, many taxonomic authorities, including the American Ornithological Society, continue to lump the species together.

Similar species: Swifts And Hummingbirds
Species identified by Barry
View Barry's profile

By Barry

Attribution Share Alike
Uploaded Mar 21, 2020. Captured Mar 10, 2020 22:00 in Calle Teniente Hugo Ortíz, Ecuador.
  • DC-TZ202
  • f/6.4
  • 10/3200s
  • ISO1600
  • 132mm