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Boelen's Python New Guinea This Boelen's Python is 3.1 mtrs (10ft 2 inches) long. Known in the mountains Papua New Guinea as Blek Moran (Black Python) or Papa Graun (Literally: "Owner of the Land!"). They also have been called "Blue" Moran because of the iridescent blue color they show in the sunlight. They are only found in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea and on Goodenough Island just off the coast. Ever since coming to PNG I have wanted to see one of these! I asked quite a few people about them. Even though they exist only here, very few people have seen one. They are endangered and fall under New Guinea's highest protection. I rescued this one from a group of men who would have eaten it if I had not bought it from them. Because I could not care for it properly, I released it in a safe environment. Three weeks after I parted with it someone brought me an 8 footer to sell. I quickly declined, not wanting to promote them being hunted out. Simalia boeleni Click/tap to enlarge PromotedSpecies introCountry intro

Boelen's Python New Guinea

This Boelen's Python is 3.1 mtrs (10ft 2 inches) long. Known in the mountains Papua New Guinea as Blek Moran (Black Python) or Papa Graun (Literally: "Owner of the Land!"). They also have been called "Blue" Moran because of the iridescent blue color they show in the sunlight. They are only found in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea and on Goodenough Island just off the coast. Ever since coming to PNG I have wanted to see one of these! I asked quite a few people about them. Even though they exist only here, very few people have seen one. They are endangered and fall under New Guinea's highest protection. I rescued this one from a group of men who would have eaten it if I had not bought it from them. Because I could not care for it properly, I released it in a safe environment. Three weeks after I parted with it someone brought me an 8 footer to sell. I quickly declined, not wanting to promote them being hunted out.

    comments (16)

  1. What a story, Matt! Still some nature conservation "education" to be done there it would seem. Difficult balancing act with indigenous peoples who have always had a much more practical/grounded contact with nature (and rightfully so) and now the "civilized" world that has caused much of the habitat loss or climate change that puts these animals under pressure comes barging in to tell _them_ off about how they handle nature ...
    Problematic discussion that one, but it doesn't change the fact that these animals need protecting :-/
    Posted 2 months ago
  2. Whoa! That is a very impressive snake! And, a great story! I love that you rescued it and that you can confidently(?) handle a snake this size! I hope it can stay safe and hidden where you released it. I will definitely be showing this photo to Dave when he gets home tonight, lol. Posted 2 months ago, modified 2 months ago
  3. Today's Facebook post:

    Boelen's python (Simalia boeleni), also known as Blu Moran or Papa Graun, is one of Papua New Guinea’s most famous snakes! It’s nonvenomous and endemic to the mountains of New Guinea. In addition to being beautiful with its bluish-black dorsum and pale yellow venter, this snake is big! This particular individual was 3.1 meters (10 ft 2in) long!! The reason for its celebrity status is because this species is incredibly secretive, extremely difficult to find, and has received the highest legal protection possible in Papua New Guinea. This particular individual has a harrowing story with a happy and hopeful ending. It had been captured by a group of people, who intended to eat it, but was fortunately rescued and set free! {Spotted (and rescued) in Papua New Guinea by JungleDragon user, Matthew Young} #JungleDragon #Boelenspython #PapuaNewGuinea #Simaliaboeleni
    Posted 2 months ago
  4. Epic find, thanks so much for saving it and sharing it with us! Posted 2 months ago
  5. Wow, majestic snake. Thanks, Matt for sharing here. I understand these local people from whom you rescued the snake, but I do not understand these modern humans who kill for pleasure, sometimes representatives of rare and endangered species! Posted 2 months ago
  6. What a lucky escape this snake had, thank you Matt. I love the pale underbelly with slashes of cream coming up on the sides in contrast with the dorsal darkness! Posted 2 months ago
  7. Thank you everyone! Almost all snakes in Papua New Guinea have 2 huge problems: 1. Most people here are, in the name of survival, deathly afraid of all snakes, so they usually kill them; 2. It is hard to find meat in most areas due to over-hunting, so they eat them. I have been told that many snakes are actually quite tasty. Green Tree Pythons are actually quite plentiful and not endangered like the ground dwelling Boelen's Pyhton. They eat the Green Tree Pythons too, but they mostly stay way high up in trees and only come down at night to feed.

    Conservation of anything, I have found, is something that is rarely taught or practiced here in New Guinea. When talking with people about the Boelen's, I always tell them how special and rare it is. I also tell people to protect them because once they are gone from PNG they will be gone from the world (in the wild at least)
    Posted 2 months ago
    1. Wow, interesting info. You are doing a good thing to spread the word about this rare snake. You may not feel like it makes an impact, but I would imagine it does. Posted 2 months ago
  8. Happy to post other pictures, but most of them have people in them. Let me know if someone would like them. Posted 2 months ago
    1. hi Matt, if not too much trouble, could you first email those extra photos to info@jungledragon.com? Posted 2 months ago
      1. Ferdy, I think they are the photos that I sent you...But, he may have more. Posted 2 months ago
        1. Ah those, thanks. Except for the one where it is boxed, I think the other photos are too "cultural", meaning, lots of people or people taking up a big part of the photo.

          I think this story is wonderful and I obviously have nothing against people. It pains me to even write this, but I want to explain why I discourage such photos currently.

          Main reason is that JungleDragon truly is optimized for wildlife photos only. The problem with people on photos is that they can pop up in places where they confuse. For example, cover photos of taxons are automatically calculated and when they show people, navigation makes little sense in such an example.

          A secondary reason is that I have to bring the illusion of a somewhat consistent policy, as we discouraged or even deleted them before. This reason is less important though.

          All in all, it's a system limitation. In the future we need a "relaxed" part that does not go into the main stream. There we can then upload "making of" material, reference illustrations, etc.

          Hope you understand, if not, just blame it on me.
          Posted 2 months ago
          1. I completely understand. I would do it the same way. I love that Jungledragon cuts out people. Most shots are more professional than mine, which I love. Posted 2 months ago
            1. Thanks for understanding, Matt.

              And by all means, please do keep posting. PNG is a unique natural treasure and you're the only one posting from there. Your contributions have incredible value and joy.

              No pressure, of course :)
              Posted 2 months ago
              1. Yes, keep posting Matt! We love your photos! Posted 2 months ago
        2. Oh, and to add...the current photo really is a perfect representation of this incredible species. I'm very excited about this post and grateful for all the work that went into it. Posted 2 months ago

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''Simalia boeleni'' is a species of python, a nonvenomous snake in the family Pythonidae. The species is endemic to the mountains of New Guinea. No subspecies are currently recognized.

Similar species: Scaled Reptiles
Species identified by Matt Young
View Matt Young's profile

By Matt Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Mar 11, 2020. Captured Jun 10, 2017 16:07.
  • iPhone 5s
  • f/2.2
  • 1/219s
  • ISO32
  • 4.15mm