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Northern Rock Barnacle (Cypris Larvae) - Semibalanus balanoides The cypris larvae are the brownish, ovalish specks to the left in the photo.<br />
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Northern rock barnacles are hermaphrodites, but cannot fertilize themselves. Copulation is followed by internal fertilization. The eggs (up to 10,000!) remain inside the shell. The eggs hatch into free-swimming larvae, which is followed by a unique cypris larval stage. The cypris larvae spend their time seeking a habitable substrate. Once it settles on a spot, it metamorphoses into its adult form, but is called a &quot;juvenile&quot; as it is much smaller than its ultimate size will be.<br />
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Habitat: Low tide zone<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/89870/northern_rock_barnacle_adults_juveniles_and_cypris_-_semibalanus_balanoides.html" title="Northern Rock Barnacle (Adults, Juveniles, and Cypris) - Semibalanus balanoides"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3232/89870_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1593043210&Signature=KZtl0i4jh9DBH8i9eUS7PlzVvvA%3D" width="200" height="144" alt="Northern Rock Barnacle (Adults, Juveniles, and Cypris) - Semibalanus balanoides The adults are the large barnacles to the right. The juveniles are the smaller ones in the middle. And, the cypris are the brownish, ovalish specks to the left in the photo. <br />
<br />
Northern rock barnacles are hermaphrodites, but cannot fertilize themselves. Copulation is followed by internal fertilization. The eggs (up to 10,000!) remain inside the shell.  The eggs hatch into free-swimming larvae, which is followed by a unique cypris larval stage. The cypris larvae spend their time seeking a habitable substrate. Once it settles on a spot, it metamorphoses into its adult form, but is called a &quot;juvenile&quot; as it is much smaller than its ultimate size will be.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Low tide zone<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/89871/northern_rock_barnacle_cypris_larvae_-_semibalanus_balanoides.html Cyprid,Geotagged,Semibalanus balanoides,Spring,United States,cypris" /></a></figure> Geotagged,Semibalanus balanoides,Spring,United States,barnacle,barnacle cypris,cypris,larvae Click/tap to enlarge

Northern Rock Barnacle (Cypris Larvae) - Semibalanus balanoides

The cypris larvae are the brownish, ovalish specks to the left in the photo.

Northern rock barnacles are hermaphrodites, but cannot fertilize themselves. Copulation is followed by internal fertilization. The eggs (up to 10,000!) remain inside the shell. The eggs hatch into free-swimming larvae, which is followed by a unique cypris larval stage. The cypris larvae spend their time seeking a habitable substrate. Once it settles on a spot, it metamorphoses into its adult form, but is called a "juvenile" as it is much smaller than its ultimate size will be.

Habitat: Low tide zone

Northern Rock Barnacle (Adults, Juveniles, and Cypris) - Semibalanus balanoides The adults are the large barnacles to the right. The juveniles are the smaller ones in the middle. And, the cypris are the brownish, ovalish specks to the left in the photo. <br />
<br />
Northern rock barnacles are hermaphrodites, but cannot fertilize themselves. Copulation is followed by internal fertilization. The eggs (up to 10,000!) remain inside the shell.  The eggs hatch into free-swimming larvae, which is followed by a unique cypris larval stage. The cypris larvae spend their time seeking a habitable substrate. Once it settles on a spot, it metamorphoses into its adult form, but is called a "juvenile" as it is much smaller than its ultimate size will be.<br />
<br />
Habitat: Low tide zone<br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/89871/northern_rock_barnacle_cypris_larvae_-_semibalanus_balanoides.html Cyprid,Geotagged,Semibalanus balanoides,Spring,United States,cypris

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''Semibalanus balanoides'' is a common and widespread boreo-arctic species of acorn barnacle. It is common on rocks and other substrates in the intertidal zone of north-western Europe and both coasts of North America.

Similar species: Acorn Barnacles
Species identified by Christine Young
View Christine Young's profile

By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Feb 13, 2020. Captured Jun 18, 2019 08:08 in 1563 Post Rd, Wells, ME 04090, USA.
  • Canon EOS 80D
  • f/10.0
  • 1/256s
  • ISO400
  • 100mm