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Orange Sheath Tunicate - Botrylloides violaceus A colonial sea squirt that often overgrows mussels, barnacles, bryozoans, and solitary sea squirts.<br />
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This species is invasive and was likely introduced to the east coast from the Pacific Northwest. I found a bunch of these little blobs on the beach during low tide. When I saw the first one, I thought it was a piece of garbage and went to pick it up. I was surprised to find it was squishy, and quickly realized that it was some sort of creature!<br />
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Habitat: Rocky intertidal habitat (brown and red algal zones) Botrylloides violaceus,Geotagged,Orange Sheath Tunicate,Spring,United States Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Orange Sheath Tunicate - Botrylloides violaceus

A colonial sea squirt that often overgrows mussels, barnacles, bryozoans, and solitary sea squirts.

This species is invasive and was likely introduced to the east coast from the Pacific Northwest. I found a bunch of these little blobs on the beach during low tide. When I saw the first one, I thought it was a piece of garbage and went to pick it up. I was surprised to find it was squishy, and quickly realized that it was some sort of creature!

Habitat: Rocky intertidal habitat (brown and red algal zones)

    comments (4)

  1. Beautiful, and your strategy to first touch and then ask questions cracks me up every time. Posted 14 days ago
    1. Thanks! I know, it's definitely a bad strategy! I need to learn to think before I act, but I am definitely a toucher...in a non-creepy way.

      Posted 13 days ago
      1. I admire the strategy, this way you find more! Posted 13 days ago
        1. Hehe, thanks! Posted 12 days ago

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''Botrylloides violaceus'' is a colonial ascidian. It can be known by the common name 'Orange Sheath Tunicate' among others.
Its native range is in the northwest Pacific from southern China to Japan and Siberia. Colonies attach and grow on solid substrates, and consist of individuals arranged in twisting rows. Outside its native range, it is considered an invasive species and are becoming more common in coastal waters of North America and other waters around the world, likely being spread by.. more

Similar species: Pleurogona
Species identified by Christine Young
View Christine Young's profile

By Christine Young

All rights reserved
Uploaded Feb 11, 2020. Captured Jun 18, 2019 07:33 in 67 York St, Kennebunk, ME 04043, USA.
  • Canon EOS 80D
  • f/5.0
  • 1/512s
  • ISO100
  • 100mm