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Oak Mistletoe (Phoradendron leucarpum) Growing on a young oak tree in a public park.<br />
<figure class="photo"><a href="https://www.jungledragon.com/image/87163/oak_mistletoe_phoradendron_leucarpum.html" title="Oak Mistletoe (Phoradendron leucarpum)"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.jungledragon.com/images/3231/87163_thumb.jpg?AWSAccessKeyId=05GMT0V3GWVNE7GGM1R2&Expires=1594857610&Signature=UL9bo37WeSY8z5%2BSmjjGNjZ0834%3D" width="200" height="134" alt="Oak Mistletoe (Phoradendron leucarpum) Growing on a young oak tree in a public park. <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/87164/oak_mistletoe_phoradendron_leucarpum.html Fall,Geotagged,Oak Mistletoe,Phoradendron leucarpum,United States" /></a></figure> Fall,Geotagged,Oak Mistletoe,Phoradendron leucarpum,United States Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Oak Mistletoe (Phoradendron leucarpum)

Growing on a young oak tree in a public park.

Oak Mistletoe (Phoradendron leucarpum) Growing on a young oak tree in a public park. <br />
https://www.jungledragon.com/image/87164/oak_mistletoe_phoradendron_leucarpum.html Fall,Geotagged,Oak Mistletoe,Phoradendron leucarpum,United States

    comments (6)

  1. Wow, this is in a different location from your previous spotting?! Posted 6 months ago
    1. Yes, this was about a 20 minute drive from our home :) Posted 5 months ago
      1. Nice! I have never seen it in nature!
        Posted 5 months ago
  2. From today's Facebook post:

    Believe it or not, mistletoe is not just for kissing! The kissing custom, for those who may not know, is this: couples caught standing under the mistletoe are obliged to share a smooch. This ritual dates back several centuries and has been featured in ancient lore. But, this is not the only use for mistletoe!

    First of all, what is mistletoe? Well, there are approximately 1,500 species of mistletoe worldwide! They are all hemiparasitic plants, which means that they grow on the branches of trees and shrubs, getting some of their nutrients from their host. But, they aren’t complete thieves as they do produce a bit of their own energy via photosynthesis.

    Mistletoe has evergreen leaves and white berries, each of which contains a very sticky seed. The seeds get eaten and disseminated by animals. They also get stuck to fur and beaks, thus getting distributed that way. Some mistletoe berries can actually explode, ejecting their seeds at 80 km/h (60 mph) over a distance of 15 m (50 ft)!

    Because of its parasitic lifestyle, mistletoe is often viewed as a pest. But, this is unfair because mistletoe is a native plant that provides many ecological benefits. It provides food, shelter, and nesting locations for a variety of animals. Mistletoe berries are toxic to humans, but they are favored by deer, elk, squirrels, chipmunks, porcupines, and many birds. The berries are an especially important food source during winter, when food is scarce. In the United States, several species of butterflies rely on mistletoe to complete their life cycles. Plus, many bird species nest in overgrown patches of mistletoe. The truth is that mistletoe has a positive influence on biodiversity, and some species have even been recognized as keystone species! So, appreciate mistletoe for its ecological and romantic benefits! {Oak Mistletoe (Phoradendron leucarpum) spotted in Georgia, USA by JungleDragon moderator, Lisa Kimmerling} #JungleDragon #Mistletoe #Puckerup #Phoradendronleucarpum #Oakmistletoe
    Posted 5 months ago
    1. Thank you for the lovely feature and all the fantastic information! Posted 5 months ago
      1. You're welcome! It is such a fascinating plant <3. Posted 5 months ago

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''Phoradendron leucarpum'' is a species of mistletoe in the Viscaceae family which is native to the United States and Mexico. Its common names include American mistletoe, eastern mistletoe, hairy mistletoe and oak mistletoe. It is native to Mexico and the south eastern half of the continental US. It is hemiparasitic, living in the branches of trees. The berries are white and 3–6 millimeters . It has opposite leaves that are leathery and thick.
Ingesting the berries can cause "stomach and.. more

Similar species: Santalales
Species identified by Lisa Kimmerling
View Lisa Kimmerling's profile

By Lisa Kimmerling

All rights reserved
Uploaded Dec 1, 2019. Captured Nov 28, 2019 17:00 in 27 Burnt Mountain Rd, Big Canoe, GA 30143, USA.
  • Canon EOS 6D Mark II
  • f/20.0
  • 1/49s
  • ISO320
  • 100mm