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Looking after next generation Like all Anemonefishes/Clownfishes, this pair of Pink Anemonefishes - Amphiprion perideraion, were looking after their babies. They will swim to the cluster of eggs laid/deposited/glued on a rock or rubbles placed next to their Anemone host, using their mouth or pectoral fins, to aerate their eggs or clean it of debris/sands. Amphiprion perideraion,Anemonefish,Anilao,Batangas,Clownfish,Fish,Nosestripe anemonefish,Philippines Click/tap to enlarge Promoted

Looking after next generation

Like all Anemonefishes/Clownfishes, this pair of Pink Anemonefishes - Amphiprion perideraion, were looking after their babies. They will swim to the cluster of eggs laid/deposited/glued on a rock or rubbles placed next to their Anemone host, using their mouth or pectoral fins, to aerate their eggs or clean it of debris/sands.

    comments (10)

  1. Oh my, absolutely stunning scene, Albert! Posted 5 months ago
    1. Thanks, Ferdy :)
      Had to take a lot of shots to get this one as they are always swimming around and skittish.
      Posted 5 months ago
  2. These actually look like Pink Anemonefish (Amphiprion perideraion) to me. I saw them at Siladen Island, Sulawesi, Indonesia. Posted 5 months ago
    1. Yes, Barry you are right.
      Thank you very much for correcting :)
      Posted 5 months ago
      1. Happy to help! Posted 5 months ago
  3. Wow! This is such an amazing scene! Perfect job capturing it! Posted 5 months ago
    1. Thanks, Christine for your kind words and appreciation :) Posted 5 months ago
  4. From today's Facebook post:

    The Pink Skunk Clownfish (Amphiprion perideraion) is a monogamous, oviparous, protandrous hermaphrodite that forms symbiotic relationships with sea anemones. Whaaat? Did I lose anyone? These clownfish live in small groups that consist of a dominant female, a breeding male, and some functionally sterile males. They are strictly monogamous in that only the dominant female and breeding male are involved in mating. But, when the female dies, the breeding male undergoes a sex change and becomes the mating female. Seriously! His testicular tissues degenerate and his gonads transform into ovaries. Then, the next largest male in the group becomes the active, breeding male. All of the remaining males move up one rank in the hierarchy each time a female dies. This is called protandrous hermaphroditism, and basically means that the fish all start life as males, but then become reproducing females in a sequential pattern. The reproductive pair may produce up to 4,000 eggs per year, which the male aerates and guards.

    This species lives in the marine waters of the Western Central Pacific, where they cohabitate with sea anemones. They are completely unaffected by the stinging cells of the anemones. The fish develop immunity to the anemone’s toxins, plus they are covered with mucus that further protects them from getting stung. The anemone protects the clownfish from predators, while the anemones benefit by getting food particles left behind by the fish. Thus, they live in a symbiotic relationship. {Spotted in the Philippines by JungleDragon moderator, Albert Kang} #JungleDragon #Pinkskunkclownfish #Amphiprionperideraion #clownfish #protandry
    Posted 4 months ago
    1. Thanks Christine, for this feature :) Posted 4 months ago
      1. You're welcome, Albert :) Posted 4 months ago

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''Amphiprion perideraion'' also known as the pink skunk clownfish or pink anemonefish, is a species of anemonefish from the skunk complex that is widespread from northern Australia through the Malay Archipelago and Melanesia. Like all anemonefishes it forms a symbiotic mutualism with sea anemones and is unaffected by the stinging tentacles of the host anemone. It is a sequential hermaphrodite with a strict sized based dominance hierarchy: the female is largest, the breeding male is second largest,.. more

Similar species: Perch-like Fishes
Species identified by Albert Kang
View Albert Kang's profile

By Albert Kang

All rights reserved
Uploaded Oct 27, 2019. Captured Oct 26, 2019 12:57.
  • TG-6
  • f/4.5
  • 1/320s
  • ISO100
  • 9.65mm